Annoying Spectators, Help???

May 26, 2012
14
0
I was performing a linking metal rings trick and when i had my big kicker ending the spectator immediately wanted to know how the trick was done and continued to try and take the rings out of my hand (the rings are gimmicked and cannot be inspected) so after numerous attempts they managed to take them and figured out how the trick was done. I really like this effect is there any way I could prevent this from happening again???
 
Apr 25, 2009
459
0
36
Yorktown, VA
Sometimes it is hard to have the spectator respect your personal space, and some of it comes from the attitude you project. I have found Cesar Milan's (the Dog Whisper's) idea of having a dominant assertive attitude will take care of most of those problems. It is when we get panicky and lose our cool that vultures swoop in and take over. Granted, this does not solve every problem. I don't run into this problem that much, because I also have the advantage of being a bit beefier that most, so a simple glance can tell a person "Back off or I will make you wish you did."

My last piece of advice would be in misdirection. By having a solid routine, you can take the heat off of one object and put it on to another. Nothing makes someone forget about the desire to inspect a prop than moving on to something else that makes them think.

These answers aren't the end all be all, but I hope they help
 

RickEverhart

forum moderator / t11
Moderator
Sep 14, 2008
3,655
465
43
Louisville, OH
Things to consider:

1.) Was the spectator a friend or family member or a co-worker?
2.) How close were you in proximity to the spectator(s)?

I'll give you advice once you have answered these for me.
 
This isn't meant to sound mean but if they managed to get your props from you and figure out how the trick is done then it is your fault.

You need to be in control. It's your show! Why would you continue performing for a hostile audience? Unless your getting paid just tell them if they can't behave you won't perform. Take more pride in yourself. Your time and skills are valuable. If you treat yourself with value and respect others have no choice but to follow suit.
 
Jan 1, 2009
2,249
3
Back in Time
We don't have the whole story here, just that you had somebody yank the props out of your hand and expose how it was done.

There are so many ways to deal with this situation. If they were friends or family, then here is how you deal with it. You stand your ground or you can simply nip this problem in the butt before it even rears it's ugly head and learn that you don't perform for your family or friends till much later in the process. This right here, is a bit harder to do because you "WANT" to show your friends or family your new skill or toy. But, it won't work for them. They know you and know that you can't do magic or sleight of hand, so trying to convince them would be a waste of time.

If this was a paid gig, then you either presented the effect with a challenge attitude or just had a bad day. Still the main problem is that you LET the guy/person take the prop away from you. In both situations you need to learn to stand your ground and tell them "No!" and to tell them to back off. Yes, they will probably be offended somewhat, but they will get over it and will hopefully start to learn not to do that anymore.

I was going to suggest to learn to read your audience a little better, but when you audience is your friends or family... That is pretty much a no go for reasons stated above and because they might be your ONLY audience at the moment.
 
May 26, 2012
14
0
Thanks for all your advice, it was a friend not a random spectator. I'll practice the trick more to make sure this doesn't happen again, and when I performed this It wasn't part of a routine so I could transition to another trick, I thought it was a stand alone effect but I'll create a routine around it
Again thanks for all your help (By the way I was around 3ft. away from the spectator in case you're wondering)
 

Josh Burch

Elite Member
Aug 11, 2011
2,961
1,096
Utah
Thanks for all your advice, it was a friend not a random spectator. I'll practice the trick more to make sure this doesn't happen again, and when I performed this It wasn't part of a routine so I could transition to another trick, I thought it was a stand alone effect but I'll create a routine around it
Again thanks for all your help (By the way I was around 3ft. away from the spectator in case you're wondering)

This answers a lot, friends are tough audiences. They don't understand that there needs to be a boundary with somethings and you can't just get rid of the props when you're just hanging out.

In the future I might approach him as an ali and tell him to give you some feedback for a routine that your working on. Let him know that you want to perform it just like you would professionally. Then go through the routine put the props away and ask for feedback. It's not the kind of thing that will fix everytime, but if you aproach him with a "can you help me" attitude rather than a "hey you want to see my new trick" attitude it's going to help him understand that you are a bit more serious about your act.
 

James555

Elite Member
Sep 10, 2011
172
0
Australia
Spectators can be very annoying sometimes, just remain in control and by all means do not let go of your stuff. Think of it in a different scenario, if somebody random on the street is wanting to take your phone and look at it, would you let them take it? I'm pretty sure your wouldn't, so how does it differ from the magic scenario?

Hope that helped.
 
May 26, 2012
14
0
This answers a lot, friends are tough audiences. They don't understand that there needs to be a boundary with somethings and you can't just get rid of the props when you're just hanging out.

In the future I might approach him as an ali and tell him to give you some feedback for a routine that your working on. Let him know that you want to perform it just like you would professionally. Then go through the routine put the props away and ask for feedback. It's not the kind of thing that will fix everytime, but if you aproach him with a "can you help me" attitude rather than a "hey you want to see my new trick" attitude it's going to help him understand that you are a bit more serious about your act.

Yes, If I ever perform to friends I'll be sure to use your advice, most of them know I've been into magic for a while now so if I ask for feedback i'm sure they'll respect my boundaries, so I thank all of you I'll be working on the routine as you read this!
 
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