Color changes?

Jan 1, 2013
29
1
I like the shapeshifter but I think that the erdnase changes 1 and 6 are best as they both have a beautiful flow and style. I use them in every performance I do.
 
Oct 19, 2012
65
1
bangalore
On stage i like to perform the snap change. But on close up situations i like shapeshifter , erdnase ,the rain change ( my invention ) , paint brush change , be kind change with tenkai palm , etc .
 

RealityOne

Moderator
Nov 1, 2009
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New Jersey
Marc's Shapeshifter change is great. Unfortunately, I see a lot of folks performing it badly - probably because they learned it on YouTube.

The change that is in Erdnase, was actually developed by Houdini. There is a great variation by Justin Miller on Army of 52 DVD.

There also is a great color change using a palmed card (blanking on the name of it but I first learned it on Simon Lovell's Packet Killer DVD - its not Simon's but he teaches it ). I also learned a simple but impressive one from Christian Engbloom at a lecture (it's on one of his DVDs too).
 

RickEverhart

forum moderator / t11
Moderator
Sep 14, 2008
3,655
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Louisville, OH
If you want another killer color change...check out my mentor Ed Ellis's on the Wire. It is called Materialize. If you put the time into this it looks like trick photography. It looks insane.
 
Sep 2, 2007
1,188
16
39
London
The change that is in Erdnase, was actually developed by Houdini.

That's highly debatable! Sorry for going a bit off topic here, but I see a lot of people saying this, and I don't think the literature really supports a definite conclusion one way or another. The only published reference to the move prior to Erdnase (as far as I know) is P T Selbit's The Magician's Handbook (1901), where it says, "For the knowledge of the movement, I am indebted to Mr Harry Houdini." To me, this sentence doesn't say that Houdini is being credited for inventing the move, rather he's being thanked for teaching it to Selbit. From what we know of Houdini, he wasn't in the habit of being modest about claiming a technique that he had invented. So, while not absolutely definitive, I suggest that this reference implies that Houdini did not, in fact, invent the move.

There are two other prominent references in the literature to the move. The first is in Camille Gaultier's Magic without Apparatus, where Gaultier specifically says that he doesn't know if Houdini invented the move, although he saw him demonstrate it. The reference which seems to be most clear that Houdini invented the move is in Elliott's Legacy to the Conjuring Fraternity, where it is referred to as a move "by Houdini". This project was fraught with conflict between Clinton Burgess and Houdini, over Houdini claiming too much credit for the book as a whole, so I contend this could also cast doubt on his credit for particular moves contained in it. Additionally, given that it was assembled from Dr Elliott's notes, the note describing the change could easily have referred to the fact that the move was taught by Houdini, which became "by Houdini" to fit the formatting of the book.

I think it's clear that this change was not invented by Erdnase, although, as is often the case, he adds subtleties into his handling which aren't often taught in other descriptions and I suggest he learned it from a magician in person (possibly August Roterberg) rather than from the literature. The evidence that Houdini invented it is, however, flimsy. I believe he would have claimed unequivocal credit for it if he'd invented it, and he doesn't. There are several such moves beginning to appear in the literature around this time and I think the origin of many of them, including this one, is probably lost to us. We can credit Houdini with introducing the wider magic world to the technique, as we do with Le Paul and "his" spread, but if we're going to be sticklers for historical accuracy, I think we should reserve judgment on whether Houdini really was the creator.
 
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WitchDocIsIn

Elite Member
Sep 13, 2008
5,740
2,854
One point of pedantry before I actually add to the conversation - 'Developed' is not the same as 'invented'.

Anyway. I most often use a variation of the Erdnase change, combining concepts from several different variations into one that I find to be both deceptive and pretty. I haven't named it, because nothing in it is original.

I also like Tony Chang's stuff. Be Kind, ChanGe and he teaches a variation of the Slydini change that I use a lot.

I think Revolver, sold here, is gorgeous but I suck at it. I just haven't put the work into it to make it look good. But I really like the look of it.

One of my absolute favorites is the Bertram Change. It seems so open and innocent.
 
Sep 2, 2007
1,188
16
39
London
One point of pedantry before I actually add to the conversation - 'Developed' is not the same as 'invented'.

Nice pedantry! Although, the same argument applies whether you meant created, improved, tweaked, or any other connotation of developed, so I suppose we'll agree to agree.

Oh, and on topic, I like the second transformation from Erdnase. I think it's a lovely move which is just as good as the first. Maybe better in some respects because people are less likely to have seen it.
 

RealityOne

Moderator
Nov 1, 2009
3,578
3,849
New Jersey
That's highly debatable! Sorry for going a bit off topic here, but I see a lot of people saying this, and I don't think the literature really supports a definite conclusion one way or another.

For a starting point, we can agree that Erdnase or Milton or Wilbur or whatever his name was DIDN'T invent that color change. If you read EACT closely, you can discern that the color change is one of the sleights that Erdanse doesn't take credit for.

One additional fact to add to your analysis:

Victor Farelli writing in June 1948 issue of The Magic Wand stated that he was shown the sleight by Houdini and Houdini was angry that Selbit published the sleight without Houdini's permission. Purportedly, Farelli talked with Selbit about this matter and Selbit admitted that he had published it without permission.

When using developed, I intended it to mean "invented." Both Roberto Giobbi and Darwin Ortiz credit the invention of the move to Houdini.

However, I agree with TeeDee, we can't be 100% sure that Houdini invented it. But, at the very least, Houdini should get credit based on the first published reference.

So, calling it the Houdini Change is at least more accurate than calling it the Erdnase Change.
 
Apr 6, 2011
540
6
Lansing, MI
I actually would have to say the ego change. I think that it without a doubt is the most visual change, and has a ton of room for creativity in execution. Although due to angle restrictions, I usually end up performing an Erdnase change using a Lepaul sidesteal.
 
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