Great Practice Technique

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Ben Long, Aug 5, 2008.

  1. I recently purchased The Classic Magic of Larry Jennings, which is phenomenal. The author, Mike Maxwell, discusses a really quite effective technique for practicing sleights. I thought I'd share it because I figured it might help a lot of people out.

    In essence, what he says is that one should never take a sleight and practice 100 times in a row in front of a mirror. What one should do instead is alternate performing the sleight with performing the action that covers the sleight.

    The example used was the pass. When one practices the pass, he or she should do the pass, then simply make the actions that cover the pass--squaring up the deck, raising it to your fingertips, etc. One should alternate between those 100 times because it will make the pass look cleaner by constantly reminding the performer what the covering action should be.

    Hope this helps!
     
  2. Hmm, I really confused about this part "alternate performing the sleight with performing the action that covers the sleight."

    Please explain. Thanks.
     
  3. I'll try and make an example.

    When practicing a color change like the erdnase, alternate between doing the move and simply rubbing the cards back and forth. So, do the change, then just do the rubbing motion with no change, do the change, then do the rubbing motion with no change. When some people do the erdnase change, it looks really like they're just doing a move, right? but for the more experienced erdnase changer guy, they can really make it look very natural and seem as if they're just rubbing the card and it changes instantly.
     
  4. A much more basic aspect would be alternating between lifting doubles and singles to make the double look more like a single.
     
  5. That's actually good advice. :)

    A more recent aspect would be the Clipshift. I was thinking about that when I read the post. :eek:
     
  6. Precisely. It trains you to think of it less as a move and more as a natural action.
     

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