Guy Hollingworth's Triumph

Feb 18, 2011
83
1
Under your bed
Hi Guys,

I have 'Drawing Room Deceptions' by Guy Hollingworth, and I really like his 'Triumph' effect, that is described in the book.

I am trying to learn the effect, but this is the first book that I am trying to learn from and I'm having a hard time because I don't know what it should look like!

So if anyone is familiar with the trick and would be kind enough to post a performance, It would be much appreciated.

Thanks alot..
-Moiz
 
Jul 14, 2010
37
0
you could just search for "Guy Hollingworth's Triumph " on youtube..you ll get several videos -.-
 
Jul 13, 2008
383
0
I have a very good mentor/retired magician friend, and he told me that the best way to learn from a book is to have someone close, like a brother, sister or good friend, read the explanation out loud to you. Then you can just do exactly what your sibling is reading, and it makes it much easier to learn, and to understand.
 

Casey Rudd

Social Director // theory11 interactive
Staff member
Jun 5, 2009
3,048
2,699
Charleston, SC
www.instagram.com
you could just search for "Guy Hollingworth's Triumph " on youtube..you ll get several videos -.-

All he will find is performances of the "new" Sybil Triumph that Dan and Dave shared. All it was, was Hollingworth's Triumph with a Sybil flourish at the end. Also, people on YouTube don't perform the other phase because they do not have the book. My suggestion is practice as you read it. What's good about books is that you can always interpret it in a different way, and you can make it "yours".
 
Sep 1, 2007
733
2
Hi Guys,

I have 'Drawing Room Deceptions' by Guy Hollingworth, and I really like his 'Triumph' effect, that is described in the book.

I am trying to learn the effect, but this is the first book that I am trying to learn from and I'm having a hard time because I don't know what it should look like!

So if anyone is familiar with the trick and would be kind enough to post a performance, It would be much appreciated.

Thanks alot..
-Moiz

This is what's wrong with magic these days.
 
Jul 14, 2010
37
0
All he will find is performances of the "new" Sybil Triumph that Dan and Dave shared. All it was, was Hollingworth's Triumph with a Sybil flourish at the end. Also, people on YouTube don't perform the other phase because they do not have the book. My suggestion is practice as you read it. What's good about books is that you can always interpret it in a different way, and you can make it "yours".

after 1 search and 2 clicks I found a video of guy himself performing a triumph...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQRM58cD6gU&feature=related
 

S.G

Feb 9, 2010
664
1
This is what's wrong with magic these days.

Yeah, that's not a jerk move at all.

It's not like he said that he didn't want to learn from the book! He just wanted to see a performance. What is wrong with that? If I see Dan and Dave's trilogy and I want to see a live performance of them, then what is wrong for asking for a performance video?
 
Jan 20, 2009
342
2
California
It's not like he said that he didn't want to learn from the book! He just wanted to see a performance. What is wrong with that? If I see Dan and Dave's trilogy and I want to see a live performance of them, then what is wrong for asking for a performance video
i agree There is nothing wrong with learning from a book and wanting to see what it looks like in a video.
im happy someone is taking time to read and learn from a book.
 
Jun 6, 2010
796
0
Nashville, TN
Yeah, that's not a jerk move at all.

It's not like he said that he didn't want to learn from the book! He just wanted to see a performance. What is wrong with that? If I see Dan and Dave's trilogy and I want to see a live performance of them, then what is wrong for asking for a performance video?

There's nothing wrong with wanting to see performance videos but one of the great things about books is that everyone can interpret it a different way. Whether you like it or not, when you watch a video on a performance of a trick you haven't mastered yet, you will copy something. When you read directly from a book, you create your own style, your own performance, and there's not really much imitation going on.
 
Sep 1, 2007
733
2
Alright I think I was far too vague in my last statement. Let me break down why I said what I did.

Drawing Room Deceptions is not a beginner book yet it's the first book this person is learning from. Based on that, they are either too inexperienced for the type of material and difficulty of the magic inside of the books. Or they've learned from so many DVDs and haven't taken the time to go back and actually learn the basics from the books. Either way they're leading themselves down the wrong path.

This is what's wrong with magic. Either people pick up too much too quickly, and end up doing everything bad. Or they haven't had the experience or had to put in the effort to go and look up something out of a book, cards in hand and read every move word for word. They've been spoon fed magic from the beginning and they don't take the art seriously.

I, now that I'm not on my iPhone, think that you should put the book down and read other things. You're not ready for the book yet. Read through other books, depending on your skill level, and eventually you can pick the book up again when you're more experienced.

There's a popular phrase in magic - "If you want to keep something a secret, put it in a book." I hate that phrase.
 
Jun 6, 2010
796
0
Nashville, TN
Alright I think I was far too vague in my last statement. Let me break down why I said what I did.

Drawing Room Deceptions is not a beginner book yet it's the first book this person is learning from. Based on that, they are either too inexperienced for the type of material and difficulty of the magic inside of the books. Or they've learned from so many DVDs and haven't taken the time to go back and actually learn the basics from the books. Either way they're leading themselves down the wrong path.

This is what's wrong with magic. Either people pick up too much too quickly, and end up doing everything bad. Or they haven't had the experience or had to put in the effort to go and look up something out of a book, cards in hand and read every move word for word. They've been spoon fed magic from the beginning and they don't take the art seriously.

I, now that I'm not on my iPhone, think that you should put the book down and read other things. You're not ready for the book yet. Read through other books, depending on your skill level, and eventually you can pick the book up again when you're more experienced.

There's a popular phrase in magic - "If you want to keep something a secret, put it in a book." I hate that phrase.

Oh ok. That makes sense. I agree with you completely. He needs to be looking at a BEGINNER book since he's a "beginner". So like I recommend to all, check out Jason England's "What to Read". It's FREE. :)
 
Jan 1, 2009
2,249
3
Back in Time
He never said he was a beginner, just that it was his first book. For all you know he could have been into magic for years and just relied on DVD's and VHS.
 
Sep 1, 2007
733
2
He never said he was a beginner, just that it was his first book. For all you know he could have been into magic for years and just relied on DVD's and VHS.

Which is something I addressed as another problem.

Beans25 said:
Or they've learned from so many DVDs and haven't taken the time to go back and actually learn the basics from the books. Either way they're leading themselves down the wrong path.
 

Keo

Mar 10, 2011
43
0
Texas San Antonio
But Beans, your opinion about what path is the right path is your own opinion. People can make a great career in magic without picking up a single book about magic. There is enough content out there in the video format that any person interested in magic, working professional, etc. can be a very successful magician. It's a different world we live in now, many things are video based now. Training at work now usually consists of videos and literature, if not that fully video depending on the job. It is still true that some training consists of only reading, but that is usually supplemented with hands on training. Nothing beats hands on training whether it have an intro through video or written word.

In theory the measure of success in a magician isn't whether they start with dvds or books, it is their ability to learn through doing and performing that is the key factor. Personally, if the original poster wants to start with Drawing Room Deceptions, I don't see any problem with that. It's going to be tough because it is a tough book to try and swallow right out of the gates. But if they stick to it and continue practicing what is in the book and whatever effects or sleights they already know, they will only gain more technical knowledge. The one's who struggle through life, learn more then those who don't.

There is no right or wrong in magic, that is why it is a profession with very different and unique performers out there. A strong foundation is key, and if they already have that, who is to say that taking on advanced technique isn't the right way to go? There are no rigid game plans past a foundation in magic, whether that be a single card trick taught by your uncle or an effect learned from a magic book found in a library. As long as the person has an actual drive and wants to learn more about magic, they will find what they seek. Magic is sheltered behind closed doors. However those doors aren't locked and if one would only turn the knob of the door and open it, they will be rewarded with a wealth of knowledge and secrets of magicians.
 
Sep 1, 2007
733
2
I understand what you're saying Keo. However, you and I both have seen the countless amount of young/beginning magicians who try to take on way too much far too soon. They're all over this website, and sadly, all over YouTube. They become hobbyist magicians who are afraid to perform for laypeople because the stuff they started with was so difficult they either get caught or they never have the confidence to go and perform the stuff.

You're right though, you could do alright without ever reading a book, but I think some of the best effects and advice are in books. Of course that's just my opinion, but that's all I can really offer. My start-up in magic was Ellusionist DVDs when they got popular about 6 years ago. About 3 or 4 years ago I realized that I knew a handful of effects but I couldn't create my own because I didn't know a whole ton of sleights or what made a good effect. That's when I went back and read all the basic books and worked my way through to the books I read now.

My opinion comes out of the growth I feel that I had when I started some great books on magic. More than I had ever learned from a DVD. It's allowed me to grow even after I put the book down.

I'm totally working off the assumption that the OP is still in the foundations stage of his magic, and that's because it's so tough to get a strong foundation without spending $700 on all the DVDs you would need. Or a couple hundred for the Tarbell Course and Card College. So either he has a ton of beginner/novice magic DVDs and he does have the strong foundation, in which case I'll re-frame my mindset on this. I just think the more likely of the options is that the OP is diving in over their head.
 
Nov 8, 2007
1,248
3
There's a place for both video and books. That's why most top creators have released material through both mediums. Sounds to me like Moiz gets that more than most of the people posting on this thread do.
 
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