Pirouette Problems

Apr 6, 2010
256
0
Ok so i know technically this should be in the Cardistry forum section, but i felt this is something that applies to other areas too.

I learnt the pirouette flourish from the Dan and Dave tutorial a couple of months ago and managed to get it to spin well commonly and for a decent length of time. Nothing special but do-able and easy.

The problem i have had with it is this: for some random reason that i do not have any clue to, one day i just completely lost my ability to do the pirouette. Every time i went to spin it with my index finger, i would unwillingly shake my hand forward with it as though that would encourage the spin.

Whats more, i kept trying to raise it into the air for some bizarre reason and got incredibly frustrated with it. So i did the sensible thing and gave it a rest (about a month or two in total without attempting or even thinking about it once.) When i tried it again the other day, the same things happened as before, and i had this strange mental block on it.

It sounds stupid but whenever i attempt it my hand has a small spasm/jerk like i explained before and i involuntarily raise my hand to encourage the spin. I think this may be incited by the block in my head that says i cant do it anymore, but i dont see why this has happened or how to undo it. No matter how hard or slowly i try to do the pirouette, i find it impossible, when the first week after learning it i did it easily whenever i felt like it.

Just wondering if anyone has experienced this at all with anything in magic and any solutions/ideas they have on it?

Cheers!
 
Apr 6, 2010
256
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Thanks for the idea but its still the same mental block.

When i brush my index finger along the underside of the card to spin it, the instinctive action is to raise my hand and the card vertically and then the weird spasm/jerk occurs and obviously the whole thing fails.

I can not for the life of me do the thing whilst keeping my hand still, its like my index signals my arm to move when it moves. So strange, thanks for the idea anyway!
 
Jun 6, 2010
185
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Las Vegas, NV
quit trying to do it for a bit. like a week or two. then come back to it and rewatch the dvd. that happens to me sometimes. I just leave it alone and don't think about it for a long time then come back to it and for some reason any bad habit I had before is completely gone.
 
Apr 1, 2009
1,067
1
31
California
muscle memory. You have to work to lose the habit. put a great deal of focus on doing it without moving your hand. also, breathing some hot air onto you middle finger helps it to stick a little better.
 
Jul 13, 2009
424
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Edmonton, Canada
about a month or two in total without attempting or even thinking about it once.

Its kinda hard to do, because sometimes you think about not thinking about it
, but basically, you are thinking about it .... ;)

Anyway, guess we are on the same boat with a thread i posted in the cardistry forum. But even though many people adviced me to take a rest from the move, i felt that i had to practice it anyway, so why not now ... I practiced a lot, and it's a lot better now ...
 
Sep 3, 2007
1,231
0
Yeah if there's a "mental block" just learn the move over again, rewatch the tutorial, and practice to overcome it. The best bet is to PRACTICE, you don't want to be making the same mistake cause practicing with the wrong method will make it worse. Identify the problem and fix it.


Good advice. But the OP doesn't know what "mental block" means.
 
Jul 26, 2008
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One of my favorite ways to get rid of "bad habits" like these is to learn the move with your other hand. Like I'm left handed, and when I get into a rut where I keep doing a move wrong with my left hand I force myself to do it with my right hand. Naturally it's a bit harder, but it's easy to build proper technique because there is no muscle memory. It's hard, but it promotes good technique, and a little ambidexterity.
 
Jun 10, 2010
1,360
1
One of my favorite ways to get rid of "bad habits" like these is to learn the move with your other hand. Like I'm left handed, and when I get into a rut where I keep doing a move wrong with my left hand I force myself to do it with my right hand. Naturally it's a bit harder, but it's easy to build proper technique because there is no muscle memory. It's hard, but it promotes good technique, and a little ambidexterity.


Heh. I'll check that out.. Jones Change is getting on my nerves.
 
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