The Magician Online

The Magician Online is a live, interactive, online experience - in the comfort of your own home. Starring Dan White. As seen by Ashton Kutcher, Ariana Grande, Chris Rock, James Corden, Jessica Alba, and President Clinton.

See details

Pressure Disclaimer?

Nov 7, 2008
295
0
Hofstra Univ.
For anyone who has pressure-

I was just thinking we should always ask the spectator if they are allergic to latex. I haven't performed this yet but I've already decided I'm going to ask.

I just thought that since this wasn't covered in the video I should share.

Any thoughts? Agree/Disagree?

have a good one
~vintage
 
Dec 23, 2007
1,579
4
34
Fredonia, NY
id probably not do that... i mean your the one in contact with it not them. They aren't going to touch it if they know they are allergic anyways.
 
Jan 9, 2008
226
0
Sacramento
well, you should be aware at least that some people are allergic. It's good to be cautious.

"Look, my next trick, your throat swells up and you die a horrible death! Voila!"
not so much
kevin
 
Nov 7, 2008
295
0
Hofstra Univ.
id probably not do that... i mean your the one in contact with it not them. They aren't going to touch it if they know they are allergic anyways.

The only thing is afterwards. I mean yea they aren't going to touch the balloon but you think the balloon could leave enough on their phone (or object) to cause concern?
 
Jan 13, 2008
1,137
0
If they are allergic to latex, they will know not to touch the balloon, and will likely vocalize their concerns (as apposed to just taking the balloon covered cell phone). At this point you would remove the cell phone (or whatever item) from the balloon, and hand it back. The spectator never has to touch the balloon. :)
 
Nov 7, 2008
295
0
Hofstra Univ.
If they are allergic to latex, they will know not to touch the balloon, and will likely vocalize their concerns (as apposed to just taking the balloon covered cell phone). At this point you would remove the cell phone (or whatever item) from the balloon, and hand it back. The spectator never has to touch the balloon. :)

the question is will their phone be safe?
 
Jan 13, 2008
1,137
0
the question is will their phone be safe?
Depends on if they voice their concern before you even do anything, I suppose. They should, if they see you with a balloon and wanting an item of theirs. I just can't see a disclaimer being needed--the balloon is in plain sight. If they're worried about their health, they should mention something.

Aside from that, I believe they should be fine, since they wouldn't be in direct contact with the latex. Although, I'm not an expert in the field, so I don't know for sure. I'd suggest consulting a doctor about if it's even an issue, first. I doubt a forum member could tell you that (unless they're a doctor...even then, how could you know for sure? Heh). Once you have the information from a medical professional, then the question of whether a disclaimer is needed should be brought up. :)
 
I aggree with the others on here, if they don't touch the ballon, they should be fine, and they should voice their concerns as soon as they see the balloon. But it wouldn't be a bad idea to casually ask them if they are allergic to latex when you pull out the balloons.
 
Sep 1, 2007
405
1
I would simply be prepared. I do not think it is rude at all if you casually ask if a person is allergic to something. Simply, when you pull out the balloon straight up ask: "You're not allergic to latex are you?" and await their response. If they say yes, have a trick 100% ready to go and simply say: "Oh no problem, let me show you this then..."

That's what I would do.


Juan Martinez
 
Nov 7, 2008
295
0
Hofstra Univ.
I would simply be prepared. I do not think it is rude at all if you casually ask if a person is allergic to something. Simply, when you pull out the balloon straight up ask: "You're not allergic to latex are you?" and await their response. If they say yes, have a trick 100% ready to go and simply say: "Oh no problem, let me show you this then..."

Thats what I was thinking- just casually ask and if they are that person can enjoy the effect from afar while you use a different spectator.
 

bd

Jun 26, 2008
584
2
San Francisco, California
Should I warn them about getting papercuts when I get them to pick a card?

Absolutely. I actually sharpen my cards using the CardSharp model SX110 IS. It gives that "razor-like" feel to the cards - I've lost a few fingers, unfortunately... :/

In response to the OP, and in suggestion to the entire community:

- Pull out your balloon.
- "You aren't allergic to latex, are you?"
- "Actually, I am!" or "No, I'm not"
- "Okay, we'll use < NEXT PERSON > for this trick then" or "awesome - do you have your <object> on you?"

Or, as suggested before, you could simply put the balloon away and continue on with another trick.
 
Should I warn them about getting papercuts when I get them to pick a card?

And that is just the attitude that ends up with a law suit pressed against them. I think that it is such a minor point in your performance but a very important one.

Without knowing anything about the effect in question, and going solely on information posted in this thread I think I would comment Like others have already suggested. I'd ask the volunteer if they had an allergy, if so, then I'd select a new volunteer.

It just isn't a good idea to muddle with other people on health related stuff. Play it safe, not sorry.
 
And that is just the attitude that ends up with a law suit pressed against them. I think that it is such a minor point in your performance but a very important one.

Without knowing anything about the effect in question, and going solely on information posted in this thread I think I would comment Like others have already suggested. I'd ask the volunteer if they had an allergy, if so, then I'd select a new volunteer.

It just isn't a good idea to muddle with other people on health related stuff. Play it safe, not sorry.

Hmmm, that's fair enough.
But don't you think that your spectators are a little smarter than that? If they had an allergy I'm sure they'd speak up about it.
 
Hmmm, that's fair enough.
But don't you think that your spectators are a little smarter than that? If they had an allergy I'm sure they'd speak up about it.

One would also assume that when someone is putting a flaming torch down their gullet that you don't rush the stage to get a quick picture with them while their attention is on other things either. Yet I've had that happen, and damn near choked on a burning skewer.

I assume nothing when dealing with other people when it comes to safety or health concerns.
 
Make a joke about it, dont make the effect sound serious.

"eheh, your not afraid of latex are you?"
or
"There is a real phobia of balloons did you know that? I guess its people thinking it will pop in there face, or maybe there allergic to latex"


Something like the above.
 
Searching...
{[{ searchResultsCount }]} Results