Problems using a nail writer

Hello t11,

Yesterday I've finally got my nail writer. The only magic shop that sells online in my country recently got a stock of nail writers and I was so happy that I will finally practice the things that I've learned in Corinda. I've only got one problem. How am I supposed to make this thing stay under my nail?? When I try to write something it just falls of my finger. Do I need "dear, why don't you cut your nails?? they are too big" nails, or ... what?
 
Apr 25, 2009
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Yorktown, VA
My magic resources are limited. Here in my country they only sell a few things and I can't afford buying from another continent. I need to be able to use what I have.

Well, in that case I will tell you what I know and hopefully that helps. Yes, you would need to grow out your thumb nail. Add practice/pressure to that mix and you have a recipe for success.
 
Jan 11, 2011
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If you bought just a simple nail writer, it's normal. In most cases the gap is too big and regardless of how long your nail is, it's not going to work well. I would advice first scratching off the paint (if there is any), and then use the pliers carefully to make the gap smaller so that writer will sit comfortably under your nail. I hope it helps :)
 
Dec 18, 2007
1,610
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Northampton, MA - USA
Traditional "under the nail" gimmicks are a pain in the waazoo which is why the majority of pros avoid them, either making their own via a thumb tip or banjo pick or else purchasing the Thumb Tip style from Vernet or alternative versions that can be obtained easily through the net . . . I emphasize this in that you really shouldn't have any big issues when it comes to on-line purchases for the right equipment.

The two types I've mentioned here, can be easily made however, the banjo pick being the cheapest and probably easiest of all. What's nice is that the writing point can be adjusted to fit your own comfort position (I've always hated the traditional writers that force you to bend the thumb and point the lead toward the paper). My writers have the lead just above the center of the main pad of my thumb be it the TT version or the Banjo pick. Too, by making my own I can use whatever type of lead I want be it regular (soft) pencil lead or the china marker type (wax pencil) lead. I'm likewise able to inexpensively keep three or more of these babies in my pockets should I break the lead or drop one during the act (and it happens to all of us).

I know that I posted a guide as to how to make these two types of writers some time ago but I don't recall if it's on TalkMagic or the MagicBunny in the UK. It may be worth the visit however.
 
Thank you Craig, but I've explained that I DO have trouble finding things on the interwebz. The sites that are located in my country sell only one kind of nail writer. The "under the nail" type. My only other sollution is to build it myself. As a result of what I said I would like to change the subject of my thread into "Please give me a good guide out there to make an efficient swami/nail writer or how you want to call it ( I know there are many types. I just want to write with my finger so any reliable method will do ). I am not really experienced in this topic, so that's why I bought that nail writer without proper knowledge of how much it sucks.
 
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Dec 18, 2007
1,610
13
62
Northampton, MA - USA
Ady, I personally can't fathom why you have problems on line unless there's some kind of government block on your end???

I'll try to put a pdf together on my two versions of the Swami device mentioned and let you go from there. In the meantime, I'd suggest you find a music store and pick-up a couple of thumb picks used for a traditional American Banjo and certain forms of Guitar playing. You want the metal picks that wrap around your thumb with a center piece (the actual pick) set towards the tip of the thumb (if flattened out it would make a T). These usually have a series of small holes in them which is beneficial when making a writer.

You will also need to find the right kind of lead that works for you and how you would typically see yourself working. I tend to use a soft lead purchased through an artist supply center in that it is thicker than normal pencil lead (NOTE: I just buy refill sticks for mechanical drawing pencils. You can but them separate or as a "kit" containing a dozen or more lead sticks a.k.a. a lifetime supply).

In addition you will want some flesh tone paint (you'll need to blend it to best match your own complexion) a bit of super-glue and/or epoxy (clear) and finally, a pop-rivet; this is a small anchor that is set into a hole drilled into two sheets of metal (typically) so as to link them as one. If you look at the images in that link, you will see a long shaft with a bubble head. . . this can be removed and will be when it comes to assembly.

NOTE TO ALL: I will post a link to the pdf here and @ E as a free download.
 
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