The Pass

Apr 1, 2009
1,077
1
30
California
I have books that cover the pass. The Royal Road To Card Magic, Expert At The Card Table, Expert Card Technique. What I'm looking for is some video learning to accompany the book learning. So basically what I'm asking is what video sources would you recommend for being the best source for properly learning this sleight?
 

RickEverhart

forum moderator / t11
Moderator
Sep 14, 2008
3,655
465
43
Louisville, OH
I also believe that Richard Kaufman has a VHS tape called "On the Pass". I cannot say I have viewed the entire thing but it didn't look too bad.
 
Jan 1, 2009
2,249
3
Back in Time
I think Akira Fujii has a video on the pass a well.

He used to have a DVD and two metal things that would help you with your pass. I don't know if he still does now, The thing was like 100 bucks and has to be shipped from japan. Not really worth the money.

There is two DVD's out there. Pass with Care. On The Pass. Both seem to be pretty good.
 
Apr 5, 2009
874
1
26
Illinois
i learned from ninja1 even after reading through royal road. and now the vegas card cheat routine is one of my favorites. its very similar to an acr...only cooler.
 
Nov 23, 2008
121
0
I wouldn't recommend Jon Kamm's video on the Pass. Even in the video you can see a few flaws with his Pass. That being said, I think the Classic Pass is in itself, flawed. Every cover invented is designed to cover a particular flaw in the Pass, thus creating a new flaw. Look up some of Steven Youell's opinions on the Pass and I think you would agree.

Jon Kamm's is also only 20 minutes long. Pretty shocking how someone could think that the Pass can be taught in 20 minutes...

Whatever you do, do not buy Ninja 1. It's a terrible description of the Pass.
 

RealityOne

Moderator
Nov 1, 2009
3,578
3,849
New Jersey
I have books that cover the pass. The Royal Road To Card Magic, Expert At The Card Table, Expert Card Technique. What I'm looking for is some video learning to accompany the book learning. So basically what I'm asking is what video sources would you recommend for being the best source for properly learning this sleight?

I also believe that Richard Kaufman has a VHS tape called "On the Pass". I cannot say I have viewed the entire thing but it didn't look too bad.

You can get Kauffman's "On the Pass" on DVD. Once you get over the 1980s look (yeah, it was originally on VHS) and the bad background music (guaranteed, you're humming it the next day) the DVD is good. His descriptions are good, but you have to watch his hands (repeatedly) to get the subtleties down. The best thing about the DVD is that it teaches almost every variation of the pass - classic, riffle, jiggle, half a jiggle, cover, Herrmann (three versions), Double Lift - Shift, Midnight Shift and Half Pass. It also teaches a couple of effects.

The other DVD that is out there is "Pass With Care" by Peter Cassford. I don't have it but I've seen mixed reviews... some love it and some hate it.

I think the best book resource is Giobbi's Card College Volume 2. Unfortunately, the pass is one of the slights omitted from the DVD version of Card College Volumes 1 and 2.
 
Mar 4, 2010
90
0
I've heard people recommend Ninja 1 then once they get the basic technique down, Pass With Care helps them to perfect their pass.
 
Sep 2, 2007
1,188
16
39
London
If you can find Ken Krenzel's The Pass video then definitely pick that up. I don't think it's been released on DVD, which is a great shame, as I think Dr Krenzel often gets overlooked by younger magicians.

Also, Randy Wakeman's The Pass DVD is excellent, teaching a large variety of shifts, many of which may be unfamiliar to you.
 
May 3, 2008
1,150
4
Hong Kong
The pass isnt really something you can learn "best from" some DVD.
Its more or less a proccess of practice as everyone's hand is different.
But if I had to recommend something... then I would go with Krenzel and Wakeman. Both are quite indepth and you also learn more than you expect. The best method would just to get the method and performance correct then go practice with someone who you think has experience/ knowledge on it. They could then give you on the spot tips and hints which fit your flaws exactly.
 
Apr 1, 2009
1,077
1
30
California
I just need video instruction to supplement my book learning. To be sure I've got the method right, etc... I don't do this with a lot of moves, but hit a wall, so I'm attempting to break it down.

Thank you all so much. I will look into the recommendations.
 
Oct 20, 2008
274
0
Austin, TX area
You can get Kauffman's "On the Pass" on DVD.
The other DVD that is out there is "Pass With Care" by Peter Cassford. I don't have it but I've seen mixed reviews... some love it and some hate it.
I have them both, and effectively learned the meager pass I perform from eagerly watching both.

Brad Henderson pointed to me that Cassford tends to rise up on the balls of his feet when he does the pass. I found that this is only true when speaking to the camera. He dances form one foot to the other when performing it out on the streets. Still, with this in mind, I found that Cassford covered a little bit of handling that Kaufman did not. The handling has the potential to look less natural, but I found the method a little easier to handle. He also has some advice on covering his handling above and beyond the usual covers.

One nicer element about the Cassford dvd is that it is set up to watch him perform the pass on loop so that you can practice along. If memory serves, the loop is made up of him performing the pass five times. This loop plays until you interrupt the dvd player with either a "stop" or "disk menu" command.

The Kaufman pass is considerably smoother and slightly less suspicious. It would almost certainly appeal more to the "hardcore" crowd. By omitting the same handling that I liked from Cassford, Kaufman's pass is both more natural and (to me) more difficult. Brad told me with no room for mistake to study from the Kaufman video if those were my two choices.

So, to summarize: Cassford's pass is probably a little easier to learn, but with a couple of pitfalls and caveats. Kaufman's pass is smoother, more natural, and more recommended by others. Like all good things, it takes more effort to perform correctly as well.

I like both and have learned from both. My experiences and my education from more accomplished magicians lean toward the Kaufman video for the more serious student.
 
Jan 31, 2010
86
1
Whatever you do, do not buy Ninja 1. It's a terrible description of the Pass.

This. Ninja 1 goes over variations such as the riffle pass, but as for actually teaching the pass, it's rushed and mediocre at best since, as Brad says, "We're expected to know it." Ironically, in CC2, he says the pass won't really be discussed because it is covered in Ninja 1.

I had a difficult time initially learning the pass. I thought it would be something that would be performable within a day or 2 at most. Obviously a silly assumption, but the fact that I was having trouble acquiring the move made me think that my learning sources were faulty. I scoured books and dvds trying to make it work, when in reality, my method was correct - it just needed loads of practice.

The important thing to remember in my opinion is that the pass is not a small move. It requires misdirection or cover of some sort. Some people like to wait, others rock their hands back and forth - I prefer to do it while squaring up the cards. My hands are already moving quickly around the deck so the packet switch is unanticipated.
 

Mike.Hankins

creator / <a href="http://www.theory11.com/tricks/
Nov 21, 2009
435
0
Sacramento, Cali
If you can find Ken Krenzel's The Pass video then definitely pick that up. I don't think it's been released on DVD, which is a great shame, as I think Dr Krenzel often gets overlooked by younger magicians.

Also, Randy Wakeman's The Pass DVD is excellent, teaching a large variety of shifts, many of which may be unfamiliar to you.

On the Pass has been released in DVD format. Check out Dennymagic.com to get it!

There are a lot of manuscripts, books, VHS tapes and DVDs that all cover/talk about the pass.

In my opinion, the pass is just like the classic force in many ways. We don't want the spectator to know that we are executing either move. So please don't fall into the realm of "Show me your pass" at your next club meeting/convention/magic shop get together. I say this because so often I see young magicians come into the magic shop and say "show me your pass".
Well, if I practice this move using misdirection and such, why WOULD I want another magician to look at my pass? Unless he is there to help me out, I am going to execute a pass on the offbeat just as I would for a layman...

I got into a tangent...my bad...

Mike
 
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