The Royal Road to Card Magic - THE Review

Discussion in 'Product Questions and Reviews' started by adjones, Jul 17, 2008.

  1. #1 adjones, Jul 17, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2008
    The Royal Road to Card Magic


    The Official Spam-



    Introduction-

    This is a nice little two page introduction to the book, written by Paul Fleming, which basically describes what you will be able to do after learning from this book, and also points you towards the right direction for some other good learning sources.

    Preface-

    This is three page letter to the reader of the book, written by the authors themselves, and quickly goes over the importance of presentation, and some ethics that all magicians, beginners and experts, should uphold.

    The Overhand Shuffle-

    This is a very common way to shuffle the cards, and doesn't require much practice to do effectively. Although it is simple in nature, there are many different effects that you can perform knowing only this simple shuffle. This chapter also has the following sections:
    -Execution of the Overhand Shuffle
    -Controlling the Top Card
    -Controlling the Bottom Card
    -Retaining the Top and Bottom Cards in Position
    -Top Card to Next to Bottom and Back to the Top
    -The Run
    -The Injog
    -The Undercut
    -Overhand Shuffle Control
    -Retaining Top Stock
    -Overhand False Shuffle
    -Overhand Shuffle Practice Routine

    Tricks With the Overhand Shuffle-

    Topsy Turvy Cards-

    You place one half of the cards face to face with the other half, and with just a snap of your fingers, the cards have righted themselves back to their original state. This is a nice little effect, but the modus operandi
    has absolutely nothing to do with the overhand shuffle.

    A Poker Player's Picnic-

    You have the spectator cut the cards into four different packets, and upon turning over the top cards in each of these packets, you find that the spectator has cut to the four Aces. This is the "Spec Cuts to the Aces" method that I used for about a year, and I like it. However, it is mostly self-working, and without the right presentation, the audience may figure it out.

    A Pocket Discovery-

    You have a spectator select a card, and place it back into the deck. You then continue by shuffling the deck (Overhand style, of course), and placing it into the spectator's chest pocket. You then have the spectator name out any number they would like, and you draw out that many cards from the top of the deck. The last card you pull out is, of course, their chosen card. This effect may seem very difficult, but in reality, it is not.

    Telepathy Plus-

    You deal down a row of five cards, and have the spectator merely think of one of them. You gather the cards up, and shuffle them into the pack. You then hand the spectator the deck, and have them name their card out loud. They then deal the number cards onto the table equal to the value of their selected card. For example, if their card was the Five of Clubs, they would deal down five cards, and the fifth card would be the Five of Clubs. This is, IMO, a great mentalism effect, but I don't use it very often, because it does require a bit of memorization.

    Thought Stealer-

    In this effect, you lay down five random cards, and once again have the spectator merely think of one of them. You gather them up, and shuffle them into the deck. Next you place them into your pocket, and ask the spectator to name their card. At this part of the effect, I usually patter about how I can feel the ink on the cards, and as I'm finishing saying this, I pull their card out of my pocket. This is honestly one of my favorite effects in the book, and I use it all the time.

    Pinkie Does It-

    You have the spectator freely select a card, replace it in the deck, and then you shuffle the cards. Their card then mysteriously rises out of the middle of the deck. At the end of the effect you can show them the sides of the deck to prove that the card really did come right out of the middle. I used to use this effect, and still do time to time, but I now have the Rising Card Deck, which is IMO better, because you can actually watch the card coming out of the middle of the deck.

    A Card and a Number-

    You have one spectator, while your back is turned, whisper a number to another spectator. You then ask them to silently deal that number of cards onto the table, and look at the card they stopped at. You then have them replace the card onto the deck. You then shuffle the deck, and ask the spectator to reveal their number. You deal that many cards onto the table, and, of course, the last card you deal down is their selected card.

    The Riffle Shuffle-

    This is yet another common way to shuffle the cards, but, once again, many things are possible using this. Also, IMO, this shuffle looks much more fair than the Overhand Shuffle. Some other sections in this chapter are:
    -Riffle Shuffle Control
    -Retaining a Card at the Top of the Deck
    -Retaining the Bottom Card or Cards
    -Riffle Shuffle in the Air

    Tricks With the Riffle Shuffle-

    An Instinct for Cards-

    First off, you have the spectator cut the cards to anyplace in the deck, look at the card they cut to, return it to the deck, and replace the "cut" packet. Then, you have them riffle shuffle the deck a few times, and yet you are still able to find their selected card. When I first read the description of this effect, I thought that it would take a lot of memorization, and the method would be very hard. However, I was wrong, and I now love this effect. However, the only setback is that it does require a tad bit of setup... but that should not stop you from performing this effect.

    Mirror of the Mind-

    Essentially, this is the same effect as above, but without as much setup. The method is not as "clean", but it works. However, I would still rather spend the thirty seconds setting up the previous effect, and have the better outcome of the two.

    Ultra Card Divination-

    You write down a prediction, and place it to the side. You then have the spectator select a card, and naturally, it matches your prediction. This is a very powerful mentalism effect, however, I had forgot about it, and haven't used it in a long time. I will definitely be practicing this one in the next couple of weeks.
     
  2. #2 adjones, Jul 17, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2008
    Flourishes-

    Upon seeing the title of this chapter, I got excited, thinking it would have some cool cuts/flourishes such as the Sybil and all that good stuff, but I was wrong. This doesn't mean that this material isn't good, because it is, but I was just a little disappointed.

    Displaying the Top Card-

    This is a nice way of showing the top card of the pack using only one hand. I use this every so often, but in general, don't really care for it.

    The Ruffle-

    This, commonly referred to as "riffling", is well, it's hard to describe, but you should know it. It is basically lifting up one end of the pack, and putting pressure on it, so the cards snap back onto the rest of the deck, creating a cool noise.

    The Click-

    This is a cool way to create a loud snapping/clicking noise from the pack, using only one hand. I still can't get it to be as loud as I would like, but it's still fun to do.

    Spread and Turnover-

    Here, you spread the cards evenly across the table, and then turn them over very pretty like. This will take time to be able to do with efficiency, but it definitely looks cool. This flourish is also called the Ribbon Spread.

    Gathering the Ribbon Spread Pack-

    This just tells you how to pick up a pack of cards that have been spread. Pretty basic stuff, but at least they do go over it for the beginners.

    Springing the Cards-

    This is, IMO, one of the coolest things you can do with a deck of cards. To a spectator, it is very cool when you can spring the cards from one hand to the other, over a distance of more than a foot! Wow!

    A Flourish Count-

    This is a very flourishy/fancy way of counting a packet of cards... using only one hand. I'm sure with some thinking, and some practice, you could use this to accomplish a false count.

    Throwing a Card-

    This teaches how to hold the card, and what motion you need to throw a card over some distance. With some practice, you can get very good at this. Just for a fun fact, the current world record distance for throwing a card is held by Rick Smith, Jr., who threw a standard playing card 216' 4".

    Waterfall Shuffle-

    This is a nice way to end the riffle shuffle. The card basically make a waterfall looking "flourish" as you let them square themselves. I have heard many people call this "the bridge"... although I don't know where that saying originated.

    The Fan-

    This is a basic Two Handed Thumb Fan, which is a way of fanning the cards using one hand to hold the cards, and the other hand's thumb to actually fan them.

    One-Handed Fan-

    The end result to this flourish is the same as the previous, but it is done with one hand. I consider this to be easier than the Two Handed Thumb Fan, but that's probably just me.

    Pressure Fan-

    This is yet another way of fanning the cards with two hands, except you use pressure on the cards to produce an almost always perfect fan.

    The Glide-

    This is one of my favorite sleights. It takes a bit of practice to get the move undetectable, but hey, what sleight doesn't?

    Tricks With the Glide-

    Design for Laughter-

    You have the spectator select a card, memorize it/show it to the rest of the audience, and replace it in the deck. You then shuffle the deck, and cut it into three packets. You go through the bottom cards of each packet, saying that you don't think any of them are the spectator's card, and laying them down in front the packet they came from. However, you seem to make a mistake, because of one of them was their card. You then pick up the last packet you cut to, and ask the spectator to name a number between one and ten. You deal that many cards onto the table, and take the last card, but don't show the audience. You ask them if they think that you got it right. They, of course, say no, but when you turn it over, it is their card. I love this effect, and perform it every chance I get. It makes the audience think that you screwed up, but in reality you didn't.

    The Observation Test-

    In this effect, you have the spectator select a card, memorize it, return it to the deck, and you shuffle up the cards. You then deal some cards off of the bottom, asking the spectator to observe the colors of the cards. You ask if they saw their card, and they say no. However, you tell them that they were so concentrated on the colors of the cards, they paid no attention to the suits or value. You turn over the last card you dealt, and it is, of course, their card.

    The Glimpse-

    The name says it all... this is a way to secretly glimpse a card. By secretly knowing the spectator's card, many awesome effects are possible.

    Bottom-Card Glimpse I-

    I believe this is pretty self explanatory... it's a method to secretly glimpse the bottom card.

    Bottom-Card Glimpse II-

    Once again, this is pretty darn self explanatory... a method to secretly glimpse the bottom card

    Top-Card Glimpse I-

    Wow, this part of the review is pretty simple... this one is a method for secretly glimpsing the top card.

    Fan Peek-

    I love this... this is a method for secretly glimpsing a card from a fan of a few cards, or the whole deck if you would like.

    Tricks With the Glimpse-

    Gray's Spelling Trick-

    Here, you have a spectator remove a card, memorize it, and replace it in the deck. You then inform the spectator that you are going to deal out cards onto the table, and you want them to spell out their card as you deal (for example, if their card was the Ace of Diamonds, they would spell A-c-e-o-f-d-i-a-m-o-n-d-s), and when the last letter is reached, to yell out "Stop!". Once they tell you to stop, you turn over the last card dealt, and it is their selected card. This is an astounding trick, and hits hard. I don't use it often, but when I do, it gets great reactions... I wonder why I don't use it more often?

    Round and Round-

    I don't really care for this effect, because it involves dealing, and, IMO, all the dealing makes it appear like a purely mathematical effect to the spectators. Anyway, onto the actual effect. You cleanly remove 10 random cards from within the deck, and have them shuffled. You then have the spectator remove one of the cards, and silently think of a number, then silently transfer that number of cards to the bottom of the pile. You then turn around, look through the cards, and inform the spectator that you are unable to locate their card. So, you turn around again, and have them transfer the same number of cards to the bottom as they did last time, and then one more. You turn back around, and look through the cards. You hand them back the cards, and slowly eliminate the cards one by one, until there is only one card left in their hand. You name their card, and it is the card they are holding.

    The Key Card-

    This is a method to finding a card, or knowing where a card is located, by, you guessed, knowing a different card's location in the deck. The Key Card can be in many places... the top, the bottom, the middle, etc. This chapter also includes the following sections:
    -The Key Undercut
    -Key Undercut Shuffle
     
  3. #3 adjones, Jul 17, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2008
    Tricks With the Key Card-

    Do as I Do-

    In this effect, you place two decks on the table... one for yourself, and one for your spectator. You ask the spectator to shuffle their deck, while you shuffle yours. You then switch the decks, to ensure the spectator that the deck you are using is in fact well shuffled. You tell the spectator to "do as you do" (hence the name of the effect). You cut the deck anyplace you would like, and look at the card you cut to... the spectator does the same. Then, you replace the card on the original top of the deck, and complete the cut... the spectator does the same. You then switch decks yet again, and have the spectator look through the deck that you just had, and find the card they cut to... you do the same. You lay down you're card, and they lay down theirs (face down). On the count of three you both turn them over... and they are the same card! I love this effect, and perform it every time I have two decks around.

    The Three Piles-

    While you're back is turned, the spectator cuts the deck into three piles, and chooses one of the piles he has cut. He spreads through the cards, mentally selects one of those cards, and then shuffles the pile that he is holding. You then turn around and tell the spectator that you think their card is twenty-sixth from the top, and to deal down twenty-six cards, and tell you if their card is in fact the twenty-sixth from the top... however, if it is not, don't tell you where their card is located. As they begin to deal, you turn around. You then turn back around, take the deck, and ask them what their card is. They tell you, and you reveal their card to be on the top/bottom of the deck (it actually varies what location is is in). I don't really care for this effect, but I'm sure some people like it.

    The Twenty-Sixth Card-

    In this effect, you have the spectator shuffle and cut the deck, and then look at the top card. You then have both you and the spectator shuffle it some more, and finally you take the deck back. You ask the spectator to name their card, and you throw the deck to your other hand... and their card is face up on top of the deck!

    A Meeting of the Minds-

    Here you have the spectator select a card, cut the deck a few times, then hand the deck back to you. You explain to them that people often accuse you of using confederates, or stooges, for this effect, so you would like them to write down their card, but don't let you see it. You then name their card out loud, and when their writing is turned over, it is, of course, the card you named.

    The Non-Poker Voice-

    For this effect, you hand the deck to the spectator, and you turn your back, telling them that you don't believe that there is such a thing as a "poker voice", and that you wish to prove your theory to them. You have them cut the deck to anyplace they would like, look/memorize the card they cut to, place it onto the other half of the deck, and complete the cut. You then have the spectator name each card off of the top of the deck, trying to keep his voice as expressionless as possible. After a while you have him stop naming cards, and tell him that on the -insert the name of their card her- their voice quivered. It is their card. I really like this one, and I would like to buy Luke Jermay's 10 Card Poker Deal and use it with this effect and probably one more.

    Intuition With Cards-

    This is a sort of "Do as I Do" effect, but doesn't require two decks. In a shell, both you and the spectator select cards, then shuffle up the packets that you are holding, and select another card from each other's packet. The cards are found to be each other's selections from earlier. I like this effect, and use it whenever I don't have two decks for Do as I Do.

    Sliding Key Card-

    This is a simple method for placing a key card into the deck where ever you need it.

    The Palm-

    Palming is secretly obtaining a card of your choice into your palm. It can then be covertly put into your pocket, back into the deck, or pretty much wherever you need it.

    Top Palm, I (Single Card)-

    This is a way of palming one card from the top of the deck.

    Top Palm, II (Several Cards)-

    This is a way of palming more than one card from the top of the deck.

    Palm Glimpse-

    The Palm Glimpse is a method of secretly glimpsing the card you have palmed.

    Replace Palmed Cards-

    This is an easy and effective way to put cards that you have palmed back onto the deck.

    Tricks With the Palm-

    Card in the Pocket-

    In this effect, you have a spectator name any hour that they like, and remove that many cards from the top of the deck, and place them on the bottom. Next you have the shuffle the deck, cut it, and count down to the number of their favorite hour. Then, they look at the card they stopped at, and return the cards back to the top of the deck. You then take the deck back, and place a card in your pocket, telling them that it is their card. You ask them to tell you what the chosen hour was, and you count down that many cards from the top of the deck. They look at the card, but it is not theirs... theirs is, of course, in your pocket. I haven't used this effect yet, but it sounds like a very good one.

    Now You See It!-

    You have the spectator choose a card, memorize it, and replace it in the deck. They are then free to shuffle the cards as much as they wish. You take back the deck, and tell them that you shall find their card, but you can only do it if you have four chances. They agree, and you continue by laying four cards down on the table. You turn the cards over one by one, but the spectator says that none of them are their card. You begin to look dismayed, but then attempt to recover by having the spectator point at any one of the cards they wish. Naturally the one they point at is their card.

    Grab-Bag Card-

    A spectator is chosen from the audience, and handed the deck. They are asked to shuffle the cards, select one at random, and show it around to the rest of the audience. They then replace the card, and you shuffle the cards. You then have them count however many card they would like into your palm, but not too many. Next you place the cards into your pocket, and take turns with the spectator taking random cards out of your pocket, until there is only one card left... the spectator's card. This sounds like a great effect, but I really don't want anybody reaching into my pocket, nor do I think anybody would really care to reach into my pocket, so therefore I choose not to perform this very often.

    Do It And Fail-

    In this effect, you do an effect, and then go against all rules and explain to the spectators how it is done. You ask them if they think they can do it, they say they can, and you ask them to demonstrate. Of course, knowing the method, they do. Bu then, with just a snap of your fingers, they are unable to do it again. I did this one at school, and they loved it. However, it does involve some "memorization" and a lot of dealing, therefore I don't usually perform it, because I don't like effects that take a long time.

    Gathering of the Clan-

    This is another good four Ace effect. In this one, you cut the deck into fourths, and place one Ace in each pile. Then, with just a magical wave of your hand, or just a simple snap, all four Aces are found to be in the same pile! Amazing!
     
  4. #4 adjones, Jul 17, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2008
    Good Luck Card-

    You tell the spectators that you used to play poker and bridge, but you quit these past times, and offer to show them why you quit. You deal down three, five card poker hands, and ask the spectator to play the part of you. You have them point to a pile, and merely think of a card from within the pile. You then replace all the cards back on top of the deck, and shuffle the cards. You then deal down five, five card poker hands, and tell the spectator to tell you when they see their card as you go through each hand. You also tell them something along the lines of your good luck card was following you around. You replace the cards on the deck, and give them another shuffle. You tell them that it didn't really start getting weird until you were in a game of bridge. You deal down a standard bridge hand (13 cards), and ask the spectator to look through the hand and see if the good luck card was in it. They say no, and you ask them to name their card out loud. When they do, you declare that it has happened to them, as well, and that you had been sitting on the card all evening! You lift up your chair, and dump the card onto the table for all to see. This is an awesome effect, but I can never get it to work for me.

    Spring Catch-

    This "effect" makes it look like you spring the cards into the air and catch the spectator's card from within the flying cards.

    A Vested Interest-

    You have a spectator freely select a card, memorize it, and replace it in the deck. After you snap, it is found to be under your vest and shirt, both of which have to be opened for you to remove the card.

    Piano Trick-

    In this effect, you have the spectator put their hands on the table as if they were playing the piano, hence the name. You put two cards in between each of their fingers, and then remove them and place them in a pile. You ask them if there is an odd or even amount of cards in the pile. They, of course, say even, but they are proven to be wrong when you show that there is clearly an odd amount of cards. I think this effect is kind of stupid, and, to me, is blatantly obvious to the spectators.

    The Backslip-

    This is a very neat method of getting the top covertly into the middle. It can also be used as a force.

    Tricks With the Backslip-

    The Tantalizer-

    Although this has absolutely nothing to do with the Backslip, this is an awesome effect that I love to use. In this effect, you have the spectator select a card and memorize it. You cut it into the middle of the deck, and deal the deck into two piles... one for you and one for your spectator. You ask them to go through their cards and see if their card is in there. It isn't, so you deal your pile into two piles, and repeat the process. You do this again and again until you are left with one card... theirs.

    Under Your Hat-

    Another great one, you take five cards, seal them into an envelope, and prop them against a hat. You have the spectator name of the cards, you snap your fingers, and when you lift up the hat, that card is shown to be under the hat, and there are now only four cards left in the envelope.

    The Overhand Shuffle, II

    Injog and Break-

    This is a method for securing a break using the Overhand Shuffle Injog... this is very similar to Dribbling to Secure a Break.

    Overhand Break Control-

    This is a way of controlling the card that you are holding a break above/below using the Overhand Shuffle.

    Overhand Lift Shuffle-

    This is a way of controlling a card using a break/the Overhand Shuffle.

    Lift Shuffle Force-

    This is a very nice way of forcing any card you want using the Overhand Shuffle.

    Spread and Break-

    This is a way of catching a break after spreading the cards and having a card replaced in the spread.

    Holding a Break-

    This section teaches you how to hold the Pinky Break that you have established.

    Spread and Break Control-

    This is a method of controlling the card you have established a break over/under to the top or bottom of the pack.
     
  5. #5 adjones, Jul 17, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2008
    Tricks With the Overhand Shuffles-

    The Sevens-

    In this effect, four cards are freely chosen from within the pack, and are found to be the four sevens! This could also be used with any other four of a kind. When I first read this effect, it reminded of Gerry Griffin, because of his "Lucky Sevens".

    Obliging Aces-

    I like this effect, and include it in my "Aces" routine. Here, you have four spectators each name a number between 10 and 20. You then add the digits of the numbers, and deal that many card onto the table, setting aside the last card. Once all the dealing is done, it is very shocking to the spectators when they see that all four cards are Aces!

    Leapfrog-

    You have a spectator select a card, memorize it, and return it to the deck, where you shuffle it into the rest of the cards. Then, surprisingly, their card pops half way out of the deck face up, and all the cards below it fall to the table.

    Spectator's Card Trick-

    I love to do this when a spectator demands to see the deck so they can show you an effect. You tell the spectator to play the part of the magician, and have you select a card, and replace it in the deck. They then have another spectator name a number. The "magician" deals down that many cards (in this case, let's say 25), as you tell them what your card was (the Four of Hearts in this case). They reveal the last card, showing that it was not your card. They then try again (let's say the number this time is 14), and of course fail. You then say you'll have to take over since they suck at this whole magician thing (but in a nicer way). You subtract the numbers to get the difference (in this case 11), and deal down that many cards. The last card you deal down is your card.

    A Poker Puzzle-

    This is a neat effect to perform when somebody asks if you can deal a good poker hand. The answer is yes... and no. You demonstrate to them by dealing five hands of five cards each, and you ending up with the four kings. You try it again, but this time you do not get the four kings... you get the four Aces!

    False Shuffles and Cuts-

    Optical Shuffle-

    This shuffle relies solely on an optical illusion that you are actually shuffling the deck using the Overhand Shuffle... when in reality, you are not. I shall say no more, due to exposure.

    Charlier Shuffle-

    I don't really like this, because it involves multiple packets, and when done too slowly, people will be able to tell that it is a false shuffle. However, when practiced long enough and executed well enough, it can be pretty convincing.

    The Cut-

    This is a very simple, two packet false cut. There are multiple variations/methods also taught in this section.

    Palm Cut-

    This is a false cut that retains multiple cards at the top of the pack... if you have tiny hands or are not good at palming, this one is not for you.

    Tricks With the Shuffles and Cuts-

    Circus Card Trick-

    In this effect, you have a spectator take a card, memorize it, and show it to the rest of the audience. They then replace it, you shuffle the cards, and then ask them to cut the deck twice. Now, you tell them that you can find their card merely by touching it, and start dealing cards face up onto the table. Once you think you have their card, you tell them that you bet them a dollar that the next card you turn over is their card. They take the bet, their card having already been laid down. However, they get quite a surprise when you reach your hand to their selected card, and simply turn it over. I used to perform this effect every chance I got, but now I don't, simply because I think it is wrong to actually take money from a spectator unless you have truly earned it.

    Black Jack, Detective-

    Here, you take out one Jack (let's say the Jack of Clubs in this case), and have a spectator take a card, memorize it, show it to the rest of the audience, and give it back to you. You carefully put them in the deck, in separate locations. However, after you thoroughly shuffle the cards, you find that the Jack of Clubs and their selected card are now side by side.
     
  6. #6 adjones, Jul 17, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2008
    The Double Lift and Turnover-

    This is a way to turn over two cards from the top of the deck, making it seem as if they are one. I don't really like the method taught, but it will suffice for the beginner. IMO, this is one of the most powerful sleights in all of card magic, because it has so many dang uses.

    Double Lift Glimpse-

    This is a secret way to glimpse the top card using the Double Lift.

    Double Lift Card Reverses-

    These are ways to actually reverse cards in the pack using the Double Lift.

    Tricks With the Double Lift and Turnover-

    Rapid Transit-

    This is a transpo effect that uses no duplicates, but because of that, IMO, isn't as good. The basic gist of the effect is that two cards (one chosen by you, the other by the spectator) are laid down on the table, and with just a snap of the fingers, they switch places.

    The Trey-

    This is a nice little effect, and the book even includes a nice little gag you can say. You show the top card, and lay it down on the table, face down. You ask them if they would like to see you turn it into a trey. The say yes, and you take some cigarette ash and call it an ash tray... however, after all the laughter has subdued, you turn it over to find that it really is a trey (a three).

    Ambitious Card-

    Also known as the ACR, this is one of my favorite card effects to perform. The basis of the effect is that a signed card is put into the middle, and with just a snap of your fingers, it jumps to the top. I don't really like this version, because it doesn't have any "variants" for the jumping to the top (i.e. Card to Mouth, Pop Up Card, "Packet Switching). Oh well, it's a good place for a beginner to start. They can also use all the other sleights in this book to make their own ACR.

    Throught and Consequences-

    This is a cool little effect using the Double Lift Reverse. Here, you have a spectator select a card, memorize it, and return it to the deck. After shuffling the deck, you tell the audience that you have secretly controlled the card to the top of the deck. You turn over the top card, but it is not theirs. Frustrated, you say that it must be the bottom card, then. However, it is not. You give the deck a quick little cut, and spread the cards out on the table, walking away... however, you quickly return to the table when the audience discovers that their card is face up in the deck of face down cards.

    Insidious Dr. Fu Liu Tu

    In this effect, you spread the cards and have a spectator select, memorize it, and place it back in the pack. You cut the cards a few times, give it a quick shuffle, and spread the cards out on the table. A card with Chinese writing on the back is discovered to be among the pack which wasn't there before. You explain that is Dr. Fu Liu Tu, and he wrote, in Chinese, their card. Here, you name their card out loud, and they start running around, screaming like crazy people.
     
  7. #7 adjones, Jul 17, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2008
    The Pass-

    Here we start getting into more advanced material. The Pass is the hardest sleight that I have learned, and I have been practicing it for months, but still pretty much suck at it. However, I have learned different methods of "passing" that I like much, much more (i.e. Spread Pass, Back Stage Pass).


    The Classic Pass-

    This is the hardest Pass that I know... however, it's the one that most people practice and use. I am ok at it, but definitely am not as good as most people. It takes a lot of practice to get this down, but once you do, it's an awesome sleight.

    Riffle Pass-

    I never did care for this Pass. It's basically performing the pass in the midst of riffling the corner of the cards.

    Spread Pass-

    Here you spread the cards, and in the midst of closing the spread, you perform a Pass.

    Spring Pass-

    This Pass relies on the misdirection of springing the cards. But, seeing as how I can't spring the cards, I can't really perform this pass.

    Tricks With the Pass-

    Off Agin, On Agin, Finnegin-

    Here, you have the spectator shuffle the pack, cut them wherever they would like, glance at the card they cut to, and replace it. Then, by just tapping the bottom half of the deck with the top half, you claim to have made their card disappeared, and this claim is confirmed by the spectator when they thoroughly examine the pack. This trick is "ok", IMO. It would make a great "in between trick", but it just doesn't suit my style.

    Kangaroo Card-

    In this effect, you have a card selected, memorized/shown to the rest of the audience, replaced, and you shuffle it into the deck. You then borrow a man's felt hat, and place the deck inside of it. You flick the hat, and their card jumps out of the hat! This is a pretty neat trick, but seeing as I don't ever see anybody wearing a felt hat these days, I can't really perform it.

    Righting a Wrong-

    This is one of those effects where it appears as if the magician fails, but then emerges triumphant (remind you of anything?). You may have the deck shuffled by any spectator at the beginning of this effect, and upon having the deck returned to you, you have a card selected, noted, and returned to the deck. You then have the spectator name their card, and you yell "8 cards down!". You deal seven cards, and upon turning over the 8th card, it is not their card (for my example, let's say their card is the Ace of Hearts, and the 8th card is the 9 of Clubs). You put the 9 of Clubs on the table, and shuffle the cards once again. You say that you're still getting a good feeling from 8, and once again deal 7 cards onto the table. However, the 8th card is the 9 of Clubs again! You now have a confused look on your face, but it is quickly gone when you realize the card you put on the table earlier is the Ace of Hearts! This is a nice little trick that I will definitely be using... I love effects where the magician appears to fail, but recovers himself.

    Blindfolded Pack-

    In the beginning of this effect, you have the deck shuffled. When the deck is back in your hands, you have a card removed, and memorized by the whole audience. Now you borrow a handkerchief. You then continue to wrap the deck in the handkerchief, and when you snap, you show that the card has penetrated through the handkerchief! This effect is pretty cool, but it does involve a certain substance that you probably won't have around the house, but can be purchased fairly cheaply on Penguin. Also, it's not very practical because not very many people carry around handkerchiefs. You could use your own, but that's not as amazing, IMO.

    Double Speller-

    Here, you have a card selected, memorized, and placed back in the pack. You say that everything in nature has a vibration, and that you shall try to find their card simply by it's unique vibration. You riffle the pack by your ear, and say that you think you found it. You turn over the top card, and ask if it is their card, but it's not. You then ask if the bottom card was their card, but it is not. So you then shuffle the cards, and ask them the name of their card. You then spell out their card, and the last card is their card! Meh, don't really like it, but that's just me.

    Miscellaneous Flourishes-

    Color Change-

    This is a very simple color change in which you place your hand over the top card, and it magically changes into a different card!

    Double Color Change-

    Here, two cards magically change into two other cards. Pretty simple stuff here.

    The Changing Card-

    I'll give you three guesses as to what this is...

    Self Cutting Deck-

    Well, this is another one of those self-explanatory things... the deck appears to have cut itself.

    Pop Up Card-

    Here a card appears to pop out of the deck.

    A Bit of Byplay-

    This is another one of those "quick tricks". Here you show the top card, thrust it into the middle of the pack, and do a color change on the top of the deck into their card. Meh.

    Charlier Cut-

    This is the famous one handed cut! This will take quite a bit of practice to do, but it's like riding a bike... you won't forget it.

    Acrobatic Aces-

    This is a cool little effect, but it could "hurt" your deck of cards. Here you show an Ace on top of the deck, and an Ace on the bottom of the deck. You place one in the middle, do a Charlier Cut, place the other one in the middle, give it a Charlier Cut, and show that they are now back beside each other!
     
  8. #8 adjones, Jul 17, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2008
    The Reverses-

    First Method-

    Well, I can't really go into detail here because of exposure, but this is a way of reversing the card in the deck!

    Second Method-

    Refer to first method.

    Third Method-

    Refer to second method.

    Fourth Method-

    Refer to third method.

    Reversed Location-

    This gives you an idea of what to do with the reversed card... a method of controlling the reversed card to the top.

    Tricks With the Reverses-

    Spellbound-

    Here you have a card selected, and looked at while you turn your head away. You turn around, have the card replaced on the top of the deck, and you cut it into the middle. You begin to shuffle the deck, and accidentaly drop a card. You ask them if it is their card, but they say it isn't. After a bit of byplay (pun intended), you have the spectator spell out their card from the face of the deck... one card for each letter. Upon reaching the last card, you ask if it is their card... but it is not. You then ask them to reveal the top card of the deck, and when they turn over the deck, their card is face-up, staring them right in the eyes!

    Double Reverse-

    This is a cool little trick in which two cards selected by two different spectators end up reversed in the pack! I'm not really gonna go into detail on this one because it's pretty simple.

    Mentalivity-

    Here, you have one person select a card, not what it is, and return it to the deck. You then shuffle the deck, and have a spectator deal down a certain number of cards while you turn your back. When you turn back around, you ask them what number they were thinking of, and when you deal down that many cards, the selected card is at that number. I like this trick fairly well, but, IMO, it is a little easy to figure out.

    Mounteback Miracle-

    In this simply amazing effect, you have a spectator think of a card, not touching it. Then, miraculously, when you deal down the cards, their card is reversed in the pack! This one looks cool, but I've never tried it out before.

    The Hindu Shuffle and Other Controls-

    Hindu Shuffle Control-

    This section teaches you how to control a card using the Hindu Shuffle... a very useful thing to know.

    ]Hindu Shuffle Force-

    I know this is going to come as a shock, but this section teaches you how to force a card using the Hindu Shuffle.

    Hindu Shuffle Glimpse-

    This teaches you how top glimpse a selected/key card using the Hindu Shuffle.

    The Step-

    This is a nice, useful way of getting a break after springing the cards and having the spectator replace the selected card wherever they would like.

    Natural Jog-

    This is another way of obtaining a break.

    Twelve Down Riffle-

    This is an easy way to control a card, where you supposedly have the spectator replace the card where they took it from, but in reality they placed it 12 cards from the top. This could fit nicely into a "mentalism" trick where you make a prediction of how far down the card would or what not.

    Tricks With the Hindu Shuffle-

    All Change Here-

    In this effect, you find two spectators' cards to be at numbers selected by the spectators... and further yet you show them that the whole deck appears to be the same card (by means of the Hindu Shuffle, of course). Meh, don't really care for it.

    Ewephindit-

    A card is selected, noted, returned to the pack, and then shuffled into the pack. You spread through the cards, remove one card, and say, "That's not your card, is it?" They of course say no, and you tell them that you will use it for this trick. You give them the random card, and spread through the cards, having them stick the card in wherever they would like (face up, of course). Having done that, you reveal that they stuck the card right next to their selected card! This effect is a cool effect to use in the middle of your routine, but I don't think it deserved to be an opener or a closer.

    The Classic Force-

    This is, IMO, the greatest force out there, in which you spread through the cards, and have the spectator select one from the pack... however, time after time it is the card that you want them to select. BTW- Gerry Griffin is da man when it comes to Classic Forcing. He Classic Force'd me when I was trying NOT to take that card. :rolleyes:

    One Hand Force-

    Here you make a fan of cards, and have the spectator select one from the fan. Often times it will be the card you want them to, but I wouldn't rely on this force too heavily. It's one of those hit or miss forces that once you fan the cards you can't really do anything about it.

    Bottom Force-

    This is a simple method of forcing the bottom card of the pack.

    Slide Out Force-

    This force seems beyond fair, and I don't think anybody would every figure out how it's done. You have a spectator stab a table knife into the deck... more specifically... right by the card you wanted them to take!

    Two Card Force-

    Here you have a spectator place a joker face up in the pack, and right in between the two cards you predicted. I love this force, because it's so simple, yet so mind blowing.

    Riffle Break Force-

    Here you riffle down the side of the cards, having the spectator say stop whenever they would like. You cut the pack where they said stop, and once again, it's the card that you wanted them to take. I love this force, and I perform it all the time.

    Sliding Key Force-

    This is a method of forcing a card by sliding a card across the bottom of the deck during the spread... I know, weird.

    Double Lift Force-

    This is a cool force that, I know it's shocking... requires a double lift. You have the spectator name a number between 5 and 15, and you count off that many cards. Then, you decide that you don't even want to see the back of their card, and give the cards to them so that they may turn around, count off the number of cards named, and look at the their card (the card you wanted them to choose :wink:).

    Cut Force-

    Here, you have the spectator cut the cards wherever they would like. You place the other packet cross wise on the pack to "mark where they cut to". It is, of course, your force card. This force, better known as the Cross Cut Force, is very bold, but can easily be pulled off with a bit of misdirection and patter.

    Tricks With the Force-

    Justice Card Trick-

    You have a spectator select a card, note it, and return it to the deck, where you shuffle the cards... but then it gets even better when you hand them the deck for them to shuffle! As they do this you pull out a blindfold, and ask the "assistant" to blindfold you. You then continue by taking the deck, splitting it into two. You deal down one half onto the table, asking if the spectator saw their card. If they say no, you deal down the other packet... if they say yes, you hand them the half that their card was in, and ask them to hand you cards face up one by one, thinking very hard of their card. Inevitably, when they hand you their card, you are able to name it! Wow, I'm discovering more and more gems while writing this!
     
  9. #9 adjones, Jul 17, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2008
    Fours of a Kind-

    Here, you have a specator select a card, and place it on the table without looking at it. You then turn over the top card (let's say it's a Nine), and you say that that card will tell you the value of their card... their card is a Nine. You set it down on the table next to their card. You then ask them to take another card, and let's say it's the 5 of Diamonds, you tell them that this card will represent the suit of their card. You tell them that their card is the Nine of Diamonds as you place the 5 of Diamonds face down on the table next to the other two cards. You then take a card for yourself, and say that the meaning of this card will be clear in a moment. You turn over their selected card, wholeheartedly thinking that it is the 9 of Diamonds... but it is a 4. With a confused look on your face, you turn over the other 3 cards, showing them to also be 4s. This awesome effect reminds me of Gerry Griffin and his "Lucky Sevens".

    Pulse Trick-

    A spectator selects a card, looks at it, and places it to the side, not letting you see it. You then hold her wrist, and tell them that you will establish their card through their pulse. You go through all the "pips" (Ace, two, three...), and tell them the number/letter of their card. You then continue by going through the suits, and tell them the suit of their card. You, of course, get it right. However, this trick gets 5 times better when they have you select a card, and they feel your pulse and tell you what your card is! This effect is great, but it can be a bit awkward holding peoples' wrists, and having them hold yours. :confused:

    Top and Bottom Changes-

    Top Change-

    This here is a way to switch the card you are holding for the top card of the deck.

    The Changing Card-

    Here, you have a spectator on your left select a card, show it to everybody, and replace the card. You then turn to your right and tell the spectator that you promise them that the card they touch will be the first spectators' card. They touch a card, and you pull it out from the deck, not letting the audience see it quite yet. You turn it over, expecting thunderous roars of applause, but it's so quiet you could almost hear a career drop :)D). You turn to the gentleman on your left and say, "This is your card, is it not?" Several people will tell you it is not, but you get your thunderous roars of applause when you turn the card over, showing it to be their card. This is a cool little trick, but I don't have the top change down yet, so I have yet to perform it.

    Top Change Byplay-

    You have a spectator select a card, and tell them that you've already messed up the trick, so if you could start over, that would be great. You then go through the deck and ask them to take another card... but it's their card! You then place it on the table, "getting rid of that card". You ask them to kindly take a different card... but yet again, it's the originally selected card! This will get much laughter, and even more when they turn over the card on the table to see that it is just a random card. Whenever I get the Top Change down, this effect will be the first on my list to perform.

    Bottom Change-

    This is a method of switching the card in your hand for the bottom card of the pack.

    Top and Bottom Changes-

    These are just some practice tips and little hints and stuff like that for the Top and Bottom Changes... just to help you out a little if you're having trouble.

    Arrangements-

    Arrangement is basically another word for "stacked deck". Obviously, all the tricks in this section require setup, and are by no means impromptu.

    Tricks With Arrangements-

    The Selective Touch-

    You have a card selected, and placed face up onto the table. Then, you have the spectator place the rest of the deck into your pocket. You tell them that you have very sensitive fingers, and you shall find the matching suit and number of their card. You reach into your pocket, and draw out a card that matches the suit of the card they chose. This by itself would be very amazing, but it gets even better when you reach back into your pocket and find the number/letter that matches their card! This trick is awesome, and would go along greatly with Telepathy Plus.

    A Future in Cards-

    In this effect, you have a spectator freely name a card, and you are able to produce it at a moment's notice.

    Jacks Wild-

    Here, you tell the spectator that you are able to deal a very good poker hands, and repeatedly deal him 3 Jacks. You then offer to take it one step further and deal him 4 Jacks! You fail... by means of dealing him the Four Aces! Besides the setup, I absolutely love this effect. It would fit very nicely into a gambling routine... more specifically a poker routine (10 Card Poker Deal, Lucky Card, etc.)

    Think Stop-

    A spectator selects a card, shows it to the audience, and replaces it back on top of the pack. You then give him the pack, and allow him to cut the deck, square it up... and then cut it again! You then place it on your left (or right) palm, and ask them to cut it again. You then announce that their card is the 21st card from the pack. However, you tell them that anybody could do that with practice, and you will attempt to find their card in a much more impressive manner. You announce that you wills start counting backwards from 21 in your head, and they are to call stop whenever they would like. They say STOP!, and you tell them what number you were on (let's say 7 to make matters simple)... their card is inevitably the 7th card from the top of the back. This effect is just mind blowing, and the setup is actually not that bad, but can not really be done in front of the audience.

    Deal Away-

    At the beginning of this effect, you patter about mental control. You offer to demonstrate this feat by projecting the name of a card to the spectator, and ask them to name the first card that comes to mind. They name a card, and you immediately say RIGHT! However, they don't believe you, so you tell them you will do it a different way. You have the spectator select a card from within the deck, show it to everybody, replace it on the top of the deck, and then make a complete cut of the deck. You tell them that you truly do not know the location of their card, but it does not matter... you are not going to find it! You hand the cards to them, and ask them to deal down onto the table however many cards they would like. They turn over the last card they dealt, but it is not their card! Let's say it is the 4 of Diamonds. You then say that that card means something, and for them to deal down 4 more cards. However, it is still not their card. You ask them to repeat it one more time (let's say the new card is the 8 of Clubs), and deal down 8 cards. This time, the last card they deal will be their card! This awesome feat of card magic astounds audiences, because you hardly touch the cards throughout the effect. This effect's setup is the exact same as the previous effect's, so you can do one right after another.

    Reds and Blacks-

    This is a widely known effect, which is pretty easy to figure out, but will still fool some laypeople. You divide the deck into two halves and set the packets on the table. You ask the spectator to take a card from each packet, not what they are, put it in the other packet, and shuffle the packets... all while your back is turned. When you turn around, you simply go through the packets, and you are able to find both cards with ease. Meh, doesn't really suit me, because you can't immediately let the audience see the cards.

    Routines-

    I'm not really going to go into great detail on this section, but it gives you some ideas for some routines using effects from the book. However, I will go ahead and list the routines.

    Routine 1-

    -Topsy Turvy Cards

    -Now You See It

    -The Obliging Aces

    -Do as I Do

    -Card in the Pocket

    -Three Cards Across

    A Table Routine-

    -A Poker Player's Picnic

    -A Poker Puzzle

    -The Good Luck Card

    A Rollicking Routine-

    -Rapid Transit

    -The Piano Trick

    -Leapfrog

    -A Vested Interest

    Card Discovery Routine-

    -A Tipsy Trick

    -The Double Speller

    -Pinkie Does It

    -A Smash Finish

    Razzle Dazzle Routine-

    -The Sevens

    -Righting a Wrong

    -The Acrobatic Aces

    -Top Change Byplay

    -The Ambitious Card
     
  10. #10 adjones, Jul 17, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2008
    Platform Tricks-

    I'm going to be perfectly honest with you guys about this section. The tricks here are rather long, and would just get very boring for both the writer and the reader. Therefore, I'm just going to list the effects... sorry.

    -Conus Ace Trick

    -Ladies' Looking Glass

    -Everywhere and Nowhere

    -Egyptian Pocket

    -Cards to the Pocket

    -Enlarging and Diminishing Cards

    -Three Cards Across

    -Everybody's Card, I

    -Everybody's Card, II

    My Thoughts-

    Wow, this has been great fun writing, and to be honest, I'm extremely glad this is done. It's been about a month in the making, and here towards the end I was beginning to hate this damn review. However, along the way I have discovered many little gems that I didn't realize were there before writing this. I'm sorry I had to split the review up in multiple parts... it was too long to fit in one, two, three... or even four posts. :D I want to remind you that the main purpose of this review was not for everybody to go through the whole thing and read every single word, but to show people who are debating whether or not to get this how much material this book really does have. It could also serve as a "guide" of sorts for people to refer to. I remember a month or two ago, RockThisTown posted his card routines, with all tricks from this book. Many people didn't know what the tricks were, and nobody wanted to explain them all... hopefully this will eliminate those problems. So all in all, this book is worth, IMO, much, much, much more than $10.46. Thanks for reading!

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Wow, that was such a detailed review. How long did you spend on it?

    Is this a review for the book or DVD?
     
  12. Oh God, I just looked at the title of the thread... can a Mod please change it to The Royal Road TO Card Magic -The Review?

    Thank yoU!
     
  13. I wrote it last summer, so I can't really remember- but it took over a month of at least 15 minutes everyday... sometimes longer. It's for the book.
     
  14. I'm sure people will understand the title of the thread without the TO.

    Wow, thanks. How is it different compared to the Card College series?
     
  15. I don't have Card College, so can't fairly compare the two. However, I'm sure Card College goes over A LOT more material, in more detail. Royal Road to Card Magic is a beginners book, and WILL get you your foundations set in card magic, but I would recommend Card College over it any day if you have the money.

    Once again, that's a subjective opinion because I don't actually own Card College- I'm just going off of reviews of it and what I've heard of it.
     
  16. Card College and Royal Road, beside the price, are totally different when it comes to aim and material. Card College's teachings will benifit the advanced as well as the beginning student, Royal Road's teachings are towards people who nevber touched a deck before. The system used in Royal Road ( sleight, then effects that uses it ) is used in Card College as well as in some other beginner books, as this system is one heck of a way to teach card magic.

    A beginner will learn a sleight, and with a very little effort will have many tricks at his disposal. Get the overhand shuffle down, and you have 6 tricks you can use ( since beginners won't need to practice the presentation, other than the points mentioned in trick description, they'll get the tricks down in no time, after learning the sleight)

    Royal Road focuses in its tricks in teaching different card principles used in methods ( mathimatical or otherwise ). Almost each trick has its own card principle or way to apply the sleight needed to achieve the effect. The focus in methods, not effects, is what makes some tricks look bad.



    while Card College focuses on presentational and misdirectional principles in its effects more, and sometimes as illustrations on how the sleight can be used effectivly in a course of an effect. Also, Card College, not only have WAY more material, but it teaches the sleight and gives ALOT of pointers that while beginners actually DON'T need ( for their beginning level, actually confuses them more), more intermediete card magicians will LOVE to know them. I recall when I first read Card College, I read alot of details and actually forgot them as I thought they are not important. After re-reading the book after 2 years, I found the details to be essential in order to make the sleight the best it can be.

    Card College ( vol.1 ) teaches 2 effects from Royal Road, The Three Piles and Thought Stealer. To this day these two effects are extremely effective, and best part is, they are in the first chapters in Royal Road.
     
  17. I actually had the time to read all your post.(I am a pretty fast reader, so it took maybe 20 min for me) It was great, there are some tricks which I will love to learn*runs off to find the book some where in the house*
    I also highly recommend pepole to buy this book. You can't go wrong with 10 to 15 dollars
    Cheers
    Andrew
     
  18. Glad you enjoyed reading it!
     
  19. Thanks for the review, it sounds like there's some good stuff in it. I'll probably go back to it sometime. I worked through the first few chapters a while ago then I got bored and went back to learning stuff from The Trilogy.
     
  20. Stick with it- you'll find some real gems in there!
     

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