Uncut sheets. What are they used for?

Dec 11, 2013
77
2
Bulgaria
So for what are the uncut sheets used for and why are they so expencive. I dont see logic in this and I think its pointless , or at least i think it's pointless because I dont know what are they used for
 
May 6, 2013
148
5
www.Ibimania.com
So for what are the uncut sheets used for and why are they so expencive. I dont see logic in this and I think its pointless , or at least i think it's pointless because I dont know what are they used for

They are art. Like any painting or a photograph, you are not supposed to pay for the money but for the value of the art. What went into designing it and printing it. They look grand give you bragging rights because they are usually rare (hence expensive).

Do you know diamonds are not scarce? They are as abundant as coal but the reason they are expensive are because of the effort that is needed to cut them. and then what are they used for?

You could use an uncut sheet as a prediction or something, if you put your mind to it you can find numerous ways to use them in but in my opinion it just cheapens the value they hold because they are not just any prop, they are what modern cardistry stands upon (i.e. glorified eye candy)
 
Dec 6, 2014
26
1
So for what are the uncut sheets used for and why are they so expencive. I dont see logic in this and I think its pointless , or at least i think it's pointless because I dont know what are they used for

strikerche - it could be a good way to get your favourite deck in uncut sheet form ( where available ) on your blank bedroom wall , also if a sealed deck e.g blue fontaines they are sold out but having an uncut sheet means you have an awesome wall / conversation thing like a.i.p bottles . hope this helps - themagi01
 

Bryant_Tsu

Elite Member
So for what are the uncut sheets used for and why are they so expencive. I dont see logic in this and I think its pointless , or at least i think it's pointless because I dont know what are they used for

Another thing about uncut sheets is that they are usually pulled from the United States Playing Card Company's production line at the request of the producer (theory11). Otherwise uncut sheets are then split into strips and then cut into individual cards.
The sheets usually cost a lot more than the deck because of the fact that a bulk of the printing order was cut into decks and only a few are saved as sheets, thereby making them rare.
In the same way that unopened decks are more expensive than opened ones, and unopened bricks are more expensive than unopened decks, uncut sheets are more expensive than the deck because it is one step removed and therefore there are fewer in existence.
As stated in other comments, sheets serve no purpose as a deck of cards as they are more like art.
 
Aug 17, 2010
411
4
An offset press takes a bunch sheets run through before it will print optimally; sometimes the pressure on one or more plates has to be adjusted, sometimes the plates are misaligned, it takes a little bit of running to get the ink flowing properly to the plates, and to the substrate that is being printed upon.

A bunch of sheets will be run through the press (called "make-readies") to get the press warmed up. After a bunch of make-readies are run and any issues addressed, you then take one as a "press sheet" which is used to confirm with the client that the job is acceptable before the order is run.

Once the client signs off on the press sheet, the order is run. As presses run extremely quickly (there were several that did over 10,000 impressions per hour when last I worked in prepress), an order is generally plus or minus 10% for most commercial jobs of any decent size. It's difficult to get an exact number with sheets going through so quickly, with a small percentage of spoilage at the press. There's also a bit that may get spoiled during finishing, so a tolerance is built into an order.

An uncut sheet is what the printer would show to the client for their approval to print the order. I'm guessing that the uncut sheets are the overage, taken by the client before the sheets are die cut into cards. Or maybe they specifically order a small number of press sheets.

In any case, that's what an uncut sheet is for. The press crew gets a press sheet ready, and it is approved for production, or rejected.
 

WitchDocIsIn

Elite Member
Sep 13, 2008
5,737
2,852
That's interesting, JButterfield. Didn't know that.

I do know that the modern companies will request uncut sheets from the USPCC. I've heard that they used to give the uncut sheets for free (Probably the overages that Butterfield mentioned) but now they charge for them. Probably when the new management took over the USPCC, they realized it's another possible revenue stream (From magicians and card collectors - go us).

But I also know that transporting and shipping uncut sheets is a royal pain in the back side. When they come from the USPCC they are in big stacks. You know how when you open a brand new deck and toss them onto a nice close up pad they just slide and spread themselves out all pretty-like? Well, uncut sheets are just huge playing cards. They have the same finish, so they slide just the same. And strapping them down isn't easy either - you can't just put straps right over the sheets, or they'll get marked up and people will complain.

Not to mention how often the cardboard tubes they're shipped in get damaged. I don't even want to think about how many I've processed.
 
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