Can one make living by doing cardistry?

Discussion in 'Cardistry & Flourishing Forum' started by Emils D., Aug 7, 2015.

  1. Basicly this is just an repost from /r/cardistry, I wanted to ask the same question here on t11.
    "I'm a bit curious. I'm into card magic at the moment more then in cardistry, but I kinda want to switch because of the fact I myself get more amazed when I do a flourish then a magic trick. We all now that magicians make money, some make lots of money, but do cardists make money too? If yes - how? I've never heard that cardists perform in hotels, restaurants etc. Sorry for my bad english."

    Original link - https://www.reddit.com/r/cardistry/comments/3g1te2/can_one_make_living_by_doing_cardistry/
     
  2. I'm sorry to say this, but the answer is probably no. VERY few people make a living off of cardistry. Take Zach Mueller for example, he is a successful cardist but manages to make money from his decks, rather than his tutorials. Sure he makes some money from his tutorials but it isn't nearly as much as his Fontaine card line. No restaurant will hire or allow for cardistry because it isn't comparable to a magic show or a musician. A long cardistry routine lasts what, eight minutes? Then what? There's only so many times people will want to watch a spring, charlier, or giant fan before the novelty wears off. The advantage magic or music can be monetized is because after your 3 minute trick or 5 minute song you can to another that is totally different. This keeps things fresh and entertaining. The only way to make any money off of cardistry is to create your own flourishes and publish them on places like the WIRE. Keep in mind this will not make up for a job in anyway, it is still purely for the fun of it.
     
  3. I believe that where it stands, cardists cannot make a living by going out in public and flourish in the same manner as a busking magician. Part of it is because the community of cardists is a relatively small one, despite the tutorials made by the day and a convention dedicated to it.

    I believe that cardists have a lot in common with jugglers.
    That isn't meant to sound negative. Both are skills that require a lot of time and practice, the performers are usually silent, and they both invoke a 'hey that's cool' sort of response from spectators.

    I think that as the community grows, so will cardistry becoming a more widespread 'thing' like Parkour/Feeerunning. The more widespread it becomes, the more people will want to go and see a Cardist at work.
     
  4. I have yet to see a guy who will "Parkour for tips", it sounds downright silly. Parkour, Freerunning, Cardistry are just some of those things that if you do it, it's mostly for your own entertainment. You were going to parkour or bust out your cardistry skills anyway. While it attracts a coolness factor it doesn't conjure the mystery or amazement that magic has. Another key flaw is that cardistry is done by the individual with no group participation (as in a spectator). The way magicians get tips is if they do a cool trick on a spectator or group of spectators (participants), since the participant got to be a part of the action they will be more open to giving the magician a dollar or two for their time and effort.
     
  5. You won't see it because the people who do it for money are called 'stuntmen' and 'stuntwomen'
     
  6. Cardistry is still relatively new, but these are exciting times exactly because it is so new: there are so many possibilities. Cardistry is art form, as are painting, photography, and dance. Some people make a living out of those, so why not cardistry?

    Look at Zach Mueller, Dan and Dave, The Virts, Andrei Jikh: what do they have in common? They are cardists, and they make money out of it. Is the cardistry revenues enough to make a living based only on it, not yet. So they branded themselves, and they sell other goods (cards, caps, books, clips, etc) and services (tutorials, teaching one-on-one, etc), and have other activities that generate money so they can continue living their passion.

    There is a photographer, Jared Polin (www.froknowsphoto.com), who shared his view on making a living out of your passion. His is about shooting on-stage, on tour, musicians and groups. But this does not generate enough money to do only this. So he branded himself, and sells stuff to pay his bills. His sayings are like: "If wedding photography generates enough money to allow you do the kind of photography that you like, then do it."

    Dancers have a hard life. They constantly do auditions and they don't get hired each time. They are passionate about their art and they are willing to do whatever it takes to live their passion. Some will make it big, some will give dance lessons, some will find some other job, but they will keep on dancing.

    Watch the Cardistry Con 2015 Sunday session, when they discuss Cardistry to make a living. This is what they say. You have to be prepared to do everything it takes to make it. Nobody is going to do it for you.

    Franky Morales was approached by Mark Ronson to shoot some cardistry in his next video. There will be more and more opportunities like this. So who knows how it is going to develop?
     
  7. Thank you Fox13. Inspired me to look more into it.
     
  8. I think you have to ask yourself what you mean exactly by "making a living doing cardistry". How much is financially defined as a "living"? Obviously the answer to that one is different for everyone.

    What is "doing cardistry" actually mean? Is devoting your life to cardistry via selling decks, products, tutorials, creating, performing not qualify? How come?

    Seems a bit silly to randomly set performing as the parameter or judge of success. I don't really constrain myself to defining "doing cardistry" solely as performing, that doesn't make sense to me. As long as your art is a big part of your life, you're going to be happy - regardless of what medium you use to achieve it.

    The people who make it possible don't limit themselves to just one aspect. There's so much more you can do with Cardistry (or anything else) like selling merchandise/brand, creating, teaching, lecturing, performing, consulting, doing commercials etc. Perhaps ONE aspect alone isn't enough to support your lifestyle but when taking all of them into consideration, it's not just a possibility - it's reality!
     
    ChristopherR2 likes this.
  9. Hi, Andrei.
    For me living is - I have a home, I have food and maybe I can go to a little trip once in a 1.5years, because I'm not used to living wealthy (tho I would like to.) "Doing cardistry " would be to use cardistry in a way so you become a brend of some kind, so people buy your tutorials and decks. I don't mean "doing cardistry" as simply flourishing on the streets or in a hotel.
    Thank you for your opinion on this question - I appreciate it very much.
     

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