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Creating an effect ?

WitchDocIsIn

Elite Member
Sep 13, 2008
5,806
2,906
My advice is this: Don't force it, and don't think of mechanics first.

Sometimes a trick will just pop into your head because of a move, but I think it's better to approach it the other way. By that I mean: Think of the effect, then figure out how to do it.

For example, a while back there was a contest. I think it was on Ellusionist, but it might have been here. The challenge was to create a sandwich trick. I'm not a big fan of sandwich tricks, so in my mind I had the thought, "I should do something that looks like a sandwich trick, but it's never actually there." It was actually kind of a trolling thought, but it got the ball rolling and I created a trick I call, "The Anti-Sandwich", which is a sort of transposition/teleportation from between the spectator's hands. I never made the video for the contest, but I worked on the trick off and on for a couple years and I'm pretty fond of it.

So don't try to force it. Just brain storm a bit about stuff that would be neat to do, and then try to come up with workable methods.
 

RickEverhart

forum moderator / t11
Elite Member
Sep 14, 2008
3,638
469
44
Louisville, OH
I'm not trying to sound mean or rude but can I ask, "Why?" Why do you want or need to create an effect. Is it to try and make some money? Is it to get your name out there? Both?

I'm just curious.

Sometimes to create an effect as Chris mentions, you need to go back in history. Try to read old Linking Ring magazines, manuscripts, etc. and then put an updated twist on them.
 
Mar 16, 2012
31
0
I'm not trying to sound mean or rude but can I ask, "Why?" Why do you want or need to create an effect. Is it to try and make some money? Is it to get your name out there? Both?

I'm just curious.

Sometimes to create an effect as Chris mentions, you need to go back in history. Try to read old Linking Ring magazines, manuscripts, etc. and then put an updated twist on them.

I'm not the writer, but I like to make up my own effects for two reasons..
1: I love the feeling of knowing something is your's.
2: When I perform for people, I'm sure they can't go home and look it up, or I can say "Yeah, I made that up." When they ask me how I did it.
 
Jan 1, 2009
2,241
3
Back in Time
Many of the good inventions came out of necessity, rather than just wanting to make some money or end up famous.

Most of the good routines/effects out there came out of the same way. A performer/hobbyist was toying with a few sleights and then it just hit them. The problem you are going to have is that your idea might have already been created and published, or it could be crap (Kevin Parker stuff.).

For magic, I would stick with what is already out there and work on that.
 

RealityOne

Elite Member
Nov 1, 2009
3,661
3,980
New Jersey
I would love to create an effect, but i am not sure what to base it off and what moves to do, could anybody help ??

I'll even go further than Christopher and Rick... DON'T.

If you are a card guy, have you worked through RRTCM, ECT, Erdnase, and LePaul - or the Card College series? Do you know who John Bannon, Brother John Hammond or Larry Jennings is?

If you are a generalist, Have you worked through Tarbell? Do you know who Jim Steinmeyer, David Acer or Tom Stone is?

What I'm getting at, is that if you are asking that question, YOU AREN'T READY. Spend your time studying magic - not just sleights and methods, but principals like plot, midpsdirection, timing, etc. Learn to perform magic before you learn to create.
 
Jun 6, 2010
796
0
Nashville, TN
I'm not the writer, but I like to make up my own effects for two reasons..
1: I love the feeling of knowing something is your's.
2: When I perform for people, I'm sure they can't go home and look it up, or I can say "Yeah, I made that up." When they ask me how I did it.

I'm not really a "creator" (actually, most magicians say they aren't), in fact, the only quality trick I've ever come up with, I put on the wire. Not so I could make money and get "famous", because that doesn't really happen, but because I was proud of it, and I thought other people could benefit from it.

Its awesome knowing something is yours, it even makes you more confident in performing it. But don't worry about that, the vast majority of people have never seen close up, live magic done just for them, so chances are, they haven't seen any trick you'll do for them. If they claim they can learn it on the internet, just tell them you made it. I don't reccommend doing this online or in front of other magicians, but non-magicians don't care, and even if you didn't tell them you made it, most people assume because they've never seen it before.

Just focus on your performance. Before you try to think of a completely new trick, think on how you can make a trick you already know better. How could you make the Biddle Trick more interesting? What if at the end of a sandwich routine, the back of their card changes color? There's no such thing as a bad idea when it comes to magic. If you can think it, you can probably find some way to do it, and the more outrageous it seems, the better.

Hopefully I helped! :)
 
Sep 26, 2007
591
5
Tokyo, Japan
I'll even go further than Christopher and Rick... DON'T.

If you are a card guy, have you worked through RRTCM, ECT, Erdnase, and LePaul - or the Card College series? Do you know who John Bannon, Brother John Hammond or Larry Jennings is?

If you are a generalist, Have you worked through Tarbell? Do you know who Jim Steinmeyer, David Acer or Tom Stone is?

What I'm getting at, is that if you are asking that question, YOU AREN'T READY. Spend your time studying magic - not just sleights and methods, but principals like plot, midpsdirection, timing, etc. Learn to perform magic before you learn to create.


I don't know how you can flat out tell someone to not try and be creative. It reminds me of this : http://truth-out.org/news/item/1014...tical-thinking-skills-in-texas-public-schools

Maybe trying to create his own trick is not the ONLY thing he should be doing, but there is no reason to tell someone to NOT try and be creative. That is absurd. You do not believe there is a possibility that WHILE he is trying to create his own magic, he can also read up on the basics / classics / necessary material to help improve his card work? In fact, I would bet that the mere fact he is trying to ignite some of his own creativity, would help him even further in his journey to becoming a better card man. He will start to think of things in different ways. Heck, perhaps he is even a born and natural inventor, who just has not bloomed / developed yet.

To the OP. Please do not take advice to heart when people say "DONT be creative and make your own magic." BUT, please do listen to their other advice, in terms of making sure you are putting in just as much effort to read up on already established classic magic, as it has centuries worth of experience, tried and proven.
 
Sep 26, 2007
591
5
Tokyo, Japan
Now to actually answer the OP:

Although I do not know your skill level. Let's say you are a beginner in card magic. First, read through Card College 1, get the handle on how a lot of the effects are done. THEN, pick up Card College 2. Go to an effect, read the effect, and before reading the method... try to come up with your own. You may come up with the same method, a completely difference one (it could be good, it could be horrible, either way is ok), or you might not come up with one at all. Then go ahead and read the actual method. As a beginner, you might want to start off assuming that the method in the book is better than your own, or you might not, but that is also a reason why having some sort of mentor is good. Someone who can explain to you why certain methods are easier, better, safer, etc... is quite valuable. As you develop, you can start taking in this advice with a bigger grain of salt, as you will be able to comprehend better card magic as a whole. After a while, you may get a better knack for how to create your own effects.

This is not the only way to create. Just giving you a place to start.
 
As i say,to create an effect, (to keep on topic as everyone else) you should broaden your knowledge as much as you can. learn as much as you can and see what is out there. You can "create" a trick, just by thinking what would be cool, but to know if anything is already out there like that, you need to go through all the material you can get your grabby hands on.
 

Mike.Hankins

creator / <a href="http://www.theory11.com/tricks/
Nov 21, 2009
435
0
Sacramento, Cali
There are people on this earth who are just creative. Point blank. 2 names come to mind...Dan Hauss and bSmith. (I sit next to bSmith everyday and trust me, he is full of crazy ideas.)

My version of Cannibal Cards came to me because of the TYPE of effect I wanted to create. I wanted to put my own personal spin on the classic effect, and by doing that I came up with some new ways to accomplish what I wanted to accomplish. I think you should first find out who your character is in magic. Who are you as a performer? Do you have a different way of talking to people, looking at people when you perform vs your normal everyday self? I think once you find out WHO you are, then you should next look at the classics and pick through them the ones that you think your character WOULD perform. As you develop your own personal style, you may realize that a particular move you are doing now, may not FIT the character you are trying to portray. That would start the process of experimenting with different ideas and moves. Who knows...from that, you may be creating something original.

Thats my .25 cents. I hope it helps.
 
Dec 18, 2007
1,610
14
63
Northampton, MA - USA
Pardon, but I get so disgusted by this sort of post in that every "kid" that's read more than 3 books on magic believes they are ready to not just develop an effect but come up with an effect that's marketable. As several have intimated, the process requires time alongside skill, experience and knowledge; that last one being paramount!

I can guide you when it comes to stage and most things dealing with the bizarre and psychic side but I can't give you squat when it comes to close-up/cards, coins, etc. I've never put the time into learning that area of magic so I'm not really qualified when it comes to developing what I'd consider to be a "professional level" system.

If you want to vanish a person or produce a car, I can make it happen; that's what I do. More so, I understand the technical needs behind such systems, stuff that the majority of magic lovers never consider in that only a select few of us ever venture down this exceptionally expensive course of doing things. The typical stage magician rarely owns more than about 6 big illusions that they either built themselves or purchased used. . . when you consider that a decent broom suspension that's 10+ years old now sells used for what it was originally retailing at, you begin to see why this is the case. But even home construction can be a pain if you're not a good carpenter and/or metal smith.

Anywho. . . don't try to bust your nogg'n coming up with something "new" . . . especially for the retail market. Come up with variations to material you already know that makes it work better FOR YOU. Let such "improvements" serve you and help build a reputation for you because they are part of YOUR show. Protect the routines as best you can but keep them close to the vest at the same time (I would send copies of the notes to a handful of trusted sources, complete with a notary stamp & post mark with date, etc. as proof of personal development. While it's not a guarantee, it will give most judges reason to side with the person hosting proof of earliest development. Especially if you give citation and credit where due and even copies of letters sent you by persons that may still be living, that had material you borrow from.)

When I was in my teens I found myself wanting to develop effects, I found that by starting backwards I could succeed. That is to say, I though of the actual impossibility first and then applied what I knew about construction, method, angles, etc. and made it feasible and frequently made such things tangible. It may be a challenge at first, but the more you do it, the easier it gets.

Best of luck!
 

RealityOne

Elite Member
Nov 1, 2009
3,661
3,980
New Jersey
I don't know how you can flat out tell someone to not try and be creative.

I told him not to waste his time trying to create an effect - there is a difference between trying to create and being creative.

Think of it this way, what would you tell someone who has never cooked before (except making macaroni and cheese) and who wants to make a five course gourmet dinner without using a recipe? Would you say "go for it?" and encourage them to "be creative"? I wouldn't. I would tell them to study the art of cooking and to work through a variety of recipes using a variety of techniques. Learning by doing.

I've been around forums a lot and can tell someone's skill level from their posts. Sort of a forum cold reading. First off, nobody who has worked through the books I've mentioned would make a post like the OP did. Why? Because if they had worked through those books, they would KNOW the answer to their question. I could also guess the OP's age and what sources the OP has been learning from. Thus, I'm giving a beginner the advice they need to hear even if that isn't the advice they asked for.

To create in magic requires that you have a foundation - the more extensive the better. The people I know who can come up with a method for anything you could imagine are the people who have massive libraries that they have worked through. They can give you five methods and the sources they have came from. They haven't wasted their time trying to create, but in learning the craft. If you have ten hours to spend on magic, that time is better spent learning that sitting around with a deck of cards trying to create an effect using the five sleights they have learned to perform (most likely incorrectly) on YouTube. Most of the effort spent by a beginner in trying to create something will be spent reinventing the wheel or worse yet, developing a method that is inferior to what has already been developed.

So to answer your question, the reason I told the OP not to try and create, is that by focusing on expanding their knowledge and performing they will become a better magician. I've seen the crap that people without a foundation create. And here is the thing, if the OP follows my advice, he will learn to create along the way and his creations will be better (and hopefully tested in front of a live audience.. Hopefully over several years) So the difference is focus. A focus on learning will make you more creative (because you will have more tools to use at your disposal).
 
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Sep 26, 2007
591
5
Tokyo, Japan
I told him not to waste his time trying to create an effect - there is a difference between trying to create and being creative.

Think of it this way, what would you tell someone who has never cooked before (except making macaroni and cheese) and who wants to make a five course gourmet dinner without using a recipe? Would you say "go for it?" and encourage them to "be creative"? I wouldn't. I would tell them to study the art of cooking and to work through a variety of recipes using a variety of techniques. Learning by doing.

I've been around forums a lot and can tell someone's skill level from their posts. Sort of a forum cold reading. First off, nobody who has worked through the books I've mentioned would make a post like the OP did. Why? Because if they had worked through those books, they would KNOW the answer to their question. I could also guess the OP's age and what sources the OP has been learning from. Thus, I'm giving a beginner the advice they need to hear even if that isn't the advice they asked for.

To create in magic requires that you have a foundation - the more extensive the better. The people I know who can come up with a method for anything you could imagine are the people who have massive libraries that they have worked through. They can give you five methods and the sources they have came from. They haven't wasted their time trying to create, but in learning the craft. If you have ten hours to spend on magic, that time is better spent learning that sitting around with a deck of cards trying to create an effect using the five sleights they have learned to perform (most likely incorrectly) on YouTube. Most of the effort spent by a beginner in trying to create something will be spent reinventing the wheel or worse yet, developing a method that is inferior to what has already been developed.

So to answer your question, the reason I told the OP not to try and create, is that by focusing on expanding their knowledge and performing they will become a better magician. I've seen the crap that people without a foundation create. And here is the thing, if the OP follows my advice, he will learn to create along the way and his creations will be better (and hopefully tested in front of a live audience.. Hopefully over several years) So the difference is focus. A focus on learning will make you more creative (because you will have more tools to use at your disposal).

There is a very large difference between "cooking a 5 course gourmet dinner" and "create a magic trick". Perhaps if the OP said he wished to create a "top-selling" effect, you would have a point with your analogy, but as it is, no, they are not the same whatsoever. As the OP only vaguely asked with advice on how to go about creating an effect, and NOTHING more, you jumped to some very fast assumptions, and then proceeded to shoot down his idea w/o trying to gain any pertinent information.

I know you have been on these forums a while, and so have I. And yes, I too can to a certain degree of accuracy guess someone's skill level from how they post. However, there is something else that could be possible with the whole situation that I was trying to address in my last post, but failed to grasp the wording.

A magician can go through book on book on book, learning and studying sleights. However, people's minds work differently, and one person may absorb material very well, learn the mechanics, learn the step by step process to various effects to a high degree of success, but still lack the creative thinking skills to create one's own effect. Just as one person is strong at math, but poor at creative writing, people in the magic community are still subject to such "mental segregation" as you will.

Now, I am not saying this is the case with the thread in question, but it does apply to your notion that you can accurately pinpoint someone's abilities from how they post. There are always things unknown.

When I saw the original post, and then saw a veteran of the boards steering someone way from developing their creative thinking... I was disappointed.

This goes for Craig B's posts as well... The OP did not say they wished to create a marketable trick for a quick buck... let us please stop with the assumptions.

Granted, the OP should have provided us with more information to give us a better idea of his skill level and experience, we should not be quick to jump on someone's limited information post and go off giving advise based on pure assumption, ESPECIALLY when there are strong phrases such as, "DONT TRY TO CREATE."
 

RealityOne

Elite Member
Nov 1, 2009
3,661
3,980
New Jersey
There is a very large difference between "cooking a 5 course gourmet dinner" and "create a magic trick".

The difference is a matter of degree. Both require some level of fundamental knowledge to be able to do them effectively. The more knowledge and skill, the easier it will be.

As the OP only vaguely asked with advice on how to go about creating an effect, and NOTHING more, you jumped to some very fast assumptions, and then proceeded to shoot down his idea w/o trying to gain any pertinent information.

I did make some assumptions and if I'm wrong, I apologize. But rereading the original post, I think that I'm correct.

I would love to create an effect, but i am not sure what to base it off and what moves to do, could anybody help ??

What I'm reading here is that the OP doesn't know a lot of plots to base an effect on and doesn't know a lot of moves to use. This isn't a creativity issue, but more of a knowledge issue. My advice was to build up his knowledge base before attempting to create.

I know you have been on these forums a while, and so have I. And yes, I too can to a certain degree of accuracy guess someone's skill level from how they post. However, there is something else that could be possible with the whole situation that I was trying to address in my last post, but failed to grasp the wording.

I don't disagree with your advice. I think the difference between what you said and what I said is yours was to balance learning and creating and mine was to learn first and then let creativity happen naturally.

A magician can go through book on book on book, learning and studying sleights. However, people's minds work differently, and one person may absorb material very well, learn the mechanics, learn the step by step process to various effects to a high degree of success, but still lack the creative thinking skills to create one's own effect. Just as one person is strong at math, but poor at creative writing, people in the magic community are still subject to such "mental segregation" as you will.

Now, I am not saying this is the case with the thread in question, but it does apply to your notion that you can accurately pinpoint someone's abilities from how they post. There are always things unknown.

I understand that people learn differently but I also understand that most creators have the knowledge I'm encouraging the OP to get.

When I saw the original post, and then saw a veteran of the boards steering someone way from developing their creative thinking... I was disappointed.

This goes for Craig B's posts as well... The OP did not say they wished to create a marketable trick for a quick buck... let us please stop with the assumptions.

Again, I don't think my post said not to develop creative thinking, but not to focus on creating until you have a foundation. Why encourage people to do something the aren't prepared for?

I'll grant you typing "DON'T" was designed to get the OP's and others attention. I'll also admit I think the whole concept of people aspiring to be creators first and performers second (if at all) is asinine and that came across in my post.

Granted, the OP should have provided us with more information to give us a better idea of his skill level and experience, we should not be quick to jump on someone's limited information post and go off giving advise based on pure assumption, ESPECIALLY when there are strong phrases such as, "DONT TRY TO CREATE."

If my assumptions that the OP is under age 16, has been in magic for less than a year, spent the first six months learning from YouTube, doesn't own a magic book and wants to come up with a trick for the Wire. If I'm wrong, he can correct me and I'll apologize. If I'm right, I hope he takes my advice. If he sticks with magic, he will thank me.
 
Dec 18, 2007
1,610
14
63
Northampton, MA - USA
I'm just curious TokyoUW, are you taking a law course or something? You seem to be splitting hairs for the sake of personal fun here.

R1 and I are two of the older and more experienced members here I believe and in my case, I will admit that I assumed the typical case scenario that I hear at least twice a week on the various forums I visit (as a whole). I wrote a piece about this for TalkMagic in the UK some years ago because so many that were less than 3-5 years in to the study of magic thought they were ready to start producing commercial effects; seems that's the big drive now days vs. actual performance time and building a solid reputation in that arena first, for the sake of name recognition and too, creating chatter around a particular bit you do in your act. Shimada's Dove on Cane was kept close to the vest for over 25 years let alone the myriad of routines & secrets that were never allowed publication, even after the performer's death.

Very few in today's magic culture have that level of discipline; they're driven by ego & greed and I'll tell you right now, most of them won't find the fame let alone the fortune. So many of them honestly believe they can be the next Houchin or Jermay or whomever else and it's best that people like R1 and I step in and explain what needs to be in place in order to get there. I believe the thing I emphasized most was knowledge and experience -- taking one's idea and working it to death through daily performances and under multiple settings so you can polish it into a gem rather than putting out one more dust collector no one will pay attention to for more than a week after purchasing it. . . if that long.

A Magazine/eZine contribution is always wise but even that requires genuine understanding of the basics and real showtime experience working it. I have file cabinets filled with effect notes, designs and schematics but only one small box full of stuff that was ever produced and used . . . I'll also point out that at least 85% of what I've developed and put on a stage, always required at least two other sets of trained and experienced eyes before it was genuinely ready to go . . . two or three, like Shadow Vision, could have still been tweaked a bit further, but we were against deadlines so things stuck.


[NOTE: Shadow Vision was a Ken Whitaker concept that I had a heavy hand contributing towards both, the final effect as well as method. The original cabinet was built around my step-daughter and our secretary @ Creative Illusions.]
 
Sep 26, 2007
591
5
Tokyo, Japan
I am not taking a law course no.

To start off, I will admit that I too am at fault for not wording my thoughts in the most appropriate manner. However, to continue to try and explain what I would like to get across, I will ask for forgiveness up front this time for the tone of my post.

I do respect both your (Mr B.) and R1's experience and long lasting contribution to this forum. However, please be aware of the fact that Respect, though deserved, is not easily given to those who constantly preach in a "I am mightier than thou" type of fashion. I confess that when I see those types of posts, my "fight the man" spirit inside of me gets stronger and harder to subdue. You have great wisdom, and I thank you for putting out in the public, and of course, free of charge.

However, I am also sensing a bit of "my way is law", somewhat kind of stubbornness in your advice as well.

I will try to explain this.

It almost as appears if you believe that any beginner should stay away from trying to create their own magic, until they are properly equipped with the experience, knowledge, and fundamentals to do so successfully. I see this as being very flawed.

Let us make another example, separate to R1's cooking example. Take a children's dance class for example. Do you believe a dance instructor will tell their students to not try and choreograph their own little dance on the premise that they lack the experience, know-how, technique, and knowledge of what makes a good dance? I believe not. The kids will create, and the finished product will be something that matches their level. It may be seen as extremely low level in the eyes of much more advanced dancers, but the creation process was successful in that it 1: challenged the students to think differently and create on their own, not just absorb what is given, 2: perhaps lets them see that they have a long way to go before they create anything of high level, and 3: most likely gave them a fun time and good memory.

The creative process is not only to aim for success. Now I don't believe someone will purposefully go out and aim to fail, but there is much to be learnt from someone trying to create something themselves and come up short.

As a white belt in Karate, when I was 5, I had to create my own Kata... do I believe it was great? I did at the time yes, but slowly but surely learned it was extremely limited. I worked hard to progress.

Why can this not be so for magicians? Perhaps the OP knows a double lift, and say... the tilt? Perhaps he only knows the glide... Should that stop him from trying to utilize those tools in a new way, to accomplish something on his own? I believe no.

I would hope that experienced magicians would try to nurture this idea. R1 did clarify that the all caps "DON'T" might have brought about the wrong impression, and that is mostly what gave me doubts to his advice, so I am glad we cleared that up.

I do agree with you that many young magicians who speak of creating new magic, are looking for quick and easy progress paths, where little to zero effort is required. However, speaking down to that level from a higher pedestal usually only accomplishes one thing, disent and disrespect for those who actually deserve it. Just look at how many "enemies" mr Harry L. has at the Magic Cafe for his constant condescending attitude and self-promotion.

Your advice and wisdom is truly valuable and I mostly agree with what you give. With this situation though, the OP mentioned nothing of marketing, or putting out publicly the creations he is trying to work towards. He looked for advice on how to start the creative process, and the two most experienced/ long lasting forum contributors clearly stated - "Don't do it". Starting out advice by shooting down the original question only masks the true wisdom you are trying to give, that being your advice to practice, read, learn, fail, improve, in other words - take it slowly and build your foundations.

It would have been better to give your opinions on how a beginner could use the creative process to assist his growth in magic, and THEN proceed to tell him the importance of focussing more on the learning aspect first.

Just my 2 cents. 2 yen, what have you.

EDIT:
And actually, I was an English teacher at a University in Tokyo for 5 years. I taught all levels from not knowing the alphabet, to returnees who have lived in English speaking countries anywhere from 3-10 years. All of the students are encouraged, actually required, to constantly write and create their own compositions, speeches, model conversations, skits, etc... As a teacher, of course my expectation for the finished product, and my advice for how each student can improve, is very different. This applies to magic in my opinion, and applies to any magician, beginner or advanced, wishing to create something.
 
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Mike.Hankins

creator / <a href="http://www.theory11.com/tricks/
Nov 21, 2009
435
0
Sacramento, Cali
In all honesty I think an important piece of information is being left out here: Social media...

Go back 17 years ago when I first started really taking magic seriously. (Not that long ago, I know)...

To learn and study, books were really the only way to go. (Unless you had the opportunity to hang out at a real magic shop.) VHS tapes were starting to come into the market, but were not that popular, because a lot of the more experienced guys said it was just a gimmick and books were just THE way to go. To even CONSIDER putting out or producing material that one had thought up was nearly impossible, unless you were already a well-known and established magician.

Now, with the way technology is going, the means to be discovered now are much easier than it ever has been. So people look at that as a way to be discovered. Kids are coming out of the woodwork left and right with a new way to do this, or an original concept to do that. And from it we see the good and the bad. Some hits and some misses.

So I 110% agree with RealityOne when he says to learn FIRST, and study whats already out there for us, before trying to invent. But with with the shift in technology, it's gonna be hard to stop people from trying to get discovered when they see themselves an abundance of new performers hitting the interwebs...

At least we have free will to click 'Buy' or hit the 'X' when we see crap. :)
 

Mike.Hankins

creator / <a href="http://www.theory11.com/tricks/
Nov 21, 2009
435
0
Sacramento, Cali
Take a children's dance class for example. Do you believe a dance instructor will tell their students to not try and choreograph their own little dance on the premise that they lack the experience, know-how, technique, and knowledge of what makes a good dance? I believe not. The kids will create, and the finished product will be something that matches their level. It may be seen as extremely low level in the eyes of much more advanced dancers, but the creation process was successful in that it 1: challenged the students to think differently and create on their own, not just absorb what is given, 2: perhaps lets them see that they have a long way to go before they create anything of high level, and 3: most likely gave them a fun time and good memory.

I know for a fact that what you say is true. My ex-wife is a dance teacher and has been teaching and has choreographed dances for MANY MANY years...for very well known people in the dance community.

She always encouraged them to continue to try to make up their own moves and their own choreography, but made sure they never forgot the moves they were taught...
 
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