Thumb cut problem

Discussion in 'Cardistry & Flourishing Forum' started by mohejazi, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. So recently I got into cardistry, and my small hands aren't really helping. The good thing is I have long fingers, and it makes the Charlier cut easy. (With about 30 minutes of practice). The problem with the thumb cut is I can't seem to get it into thumb grip. If I just place it there and drop the pack like andrei teaches in genesis it falls off my hand. At this point any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks
     
  2. Try with a bridge size deck of cards
     
  3. Generally, when someone has problems with the thumb cut, their grip is just a little off. You have long fingers, so this cut theoretically shouldn't be a problem for you. Try to really get your thumb over the edge of the pack, angle your wrist up a little bit if it helps. Push the deck up with the pointer finger to angle it even more, anything to get it deeper into your thumb. Your thumb should be holding the entire edge pretty much. Try doing it with half the deck first, or even a quarter of the deck then work your way up to the full deck. To be honest, I rarely find myself doing thumb cuts with the full deck. I'm almost always doing them with half of the deck because both of my hands are doing the cut usually.
     
  4. really want to stick to normal deck =p but ty anyway !
     
  5. Thanks, planning on trying it out tonight :D
     
  6. I wouldn't recommend using bridge size cards, it could end up being a crutch more than anything else.

    The thumb cut can be tricky, and it definitely requires a bit of a stretch, even for experienced card handlers. I haven't seen Genesis, but what you said about "dropping" the packet doesn't quite sound like the correct technique for a thumb cut - is that a simplified version?

    Either way, it's tough to narrow down on your exact problem unless I can see you do it. If you have Skype I would be more than happy to take a look at your technique and help you out.

    Best,
    Vince
     
  7. There was a time when all magicians really used were Fox Lake Bridge sized cards if they wanted any gaffs or gimmicks. There are more than a few older guys who still use nothing but bridge size cards. If you are okay with limited back designs nothing wrong with bridge size cards.
     
  8. I just said to used a bridge size deck for learning the move correctly, to let your hand addapt it self to a new move, and then go back to poker size, don't forget to stretch your hand before doing it
     
  9. I agree that they can help get you used to the movements, I'm only saying don't get too used to them - it sounds like we agree here. Personally, I often practice moves, tricky or not, with Jack Daniel's extra large decks. Once I've worked on a move for a while with those, going back to poker sized is a breeeze.

    Best,
    Vince
     
  10. But why not use the bridge sized full time if they fit the person better? There is nothing wrong with bridge size cards other than limited back design.
     
  11. I am also new to cardistry and am killing it with the Charlier, but the thumb cut frustrates me to no end. I also starting with AJ Genesis v1 material btw.

    Not only am I having problems thumb gripping the deck, but I can't seem properly secure the other half of the deck or close it again. I am following AJ's advice to move the deck away from your wrist, but even if I use my other hand to jam the deck into my thumb grip, it still seems like it falls too closely to my fingers to properly fold the other pack.

    I'm going to try using half the deck (or less) and see if I can get the knack. DO you guys have any advice in the meantime?
     
  12. use half the deck, after a while you'll get the hang of it. All this stuff just comes with time and practice :)
     
  13. Go check out the size of Lee Asher's hands, and I think you'll see that no one needs bridge sized cards, unless they are perhaps very young and thus still growing.

    I believe in challenging yourself and overcoming barriers. Got small hands? Practice even harder and you may wind up even more skilled than people with larger hands.

    Best,
    Vince
     

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