Impromptu floating table

Dec 18, 2007
1,610
14
63
Northampton, MA - USA
I've heard nothing but good things about this system, my problem is that it is being marketed to the general magic community and not be held back for the Mentalism and more specifically "Seance" workers market. To most that might sound like an odd grievance but there is a reason for it that any mystery worker out there knows already; magicians will turn it into a trick or betchya and destroy the value the effect has to its credit at present. This is exactly what happened to the Mental Epic, Smash & Stab and other pieces that were developed for the Mentalists community but "adopted" by magicians that do not understand the nuances and psychological differences between the two arts. . . then again I've recently seen ads in which classic Sponge Balls and Knife thru Coat were being promoted as "Mentalism"

If this is the direction we're headed I beg someone to just kill me now so I don't have to witness it.
 
Dec 18, 2007
1,610
14
63
Northampton, MA - USA
Two things. One - CSS is a website programming language, and they are talking about that. Two - It's an ad bot.

Yep! The whole table pitch thing was in fact an ad. . . don't you just love how sneaky SPAM has gotten over the years?

Yes, I've seen and worked with several different kinds of floating tables but my work with them is based more like the old Mediums did things vs. those in our present that do a waltz with a Zombie end-table thinking it's spooky or worse, "Mentalism".

The sweetest of all floating tables has to be the Berglass Table as presented by Copperfield some years ago. . . it's freak'n awesome! But sadly, it's not practical.

The majority of floating tables on the market don't look heavy and that in turn hurts the effect. The older tables looked like they had some heft to them which made the effect far stronger, psychologically. The flimsy balsa wood things on the market today simply don't get it nor do the operators get the fact that a true spirit table only raises a few inches to a foot off the floor and then drops down with a thud. . . and that's only if they actually get airborne, most simply rock and glide across the floor which requires no gimmick whatsoever.

This all leaves us with a serious question; Is it worth the few hundred or thousand dollars one must invest into said device if you can do it impromptu with most furniture designs found in the average home, gimmick free?

My curiosity has me when it comes to LIFT but for me and the kind of work I specialize in, there is no real need for any kind of special table, especially something that's delicate and unable to function as an actual plant or phone stand, such as was used in the good ole days of charlatan madness.
 
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