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Are you dark... or just a punk?

Sep 2, 2007
1,693
1
Guys,

I'm going to leave this thread open for now, but let's stray from any unnecessary, back-and-forth arguments and personal attacks. The topic is interesting and thought-provoking, so let us stick to it -- in a professional and respectful manner.

Thanks,
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Dec 22, 2007
567
1
Long Island, New York
After re-reading the essay I have to ask...

What would be the point of being a creepy performer? From the essay, it seems that "creepy" in this context means someone who is really doing disturbing things and covers it up. If you're a creepy performer, then wouldn't you try to hide the fact that you collect body parts? If so then being creepy would make you no different than any non-dark performer because of the fact that you don't show your creepy side.
 
Sep 1, 2007
3,786
15
From the essay, it seems that "creepy" in this context means someone who is really doing disturbing things and covers it up.

Specifically, creepiness comes from the Shadow inadvertently exposing itself. Everyone has a Shadow. We all have done things we're not proud of and prefer not to talk about.

But when you continue to do them, whether out of self-gratification or compulsion and then hide them because we're aware of the consequences, that's creepy. It can be as horrifying is John Wayne Gacy's story, or much more subtle and low-key like the guy who constantly flatters and pretends to be a woman's friend when it's clear to everyone that he really just wants to sleep with her and is trying to manipulate her by guilting her into liking him.

Remember, creepiness is the accidental exposure of the Shadow contradicting the facade.

If so then being creepy would make you no different than any non-dark performer because of the fact that you don't show your creepy side.

Again, creepiness has to be done subtly, tactfully, and with the utmost restraint in performance.

Showing people severed body parts is neither spooky nor creepy. It's tasteless and gross. However, a performer who uses a set of knucklebone dice in his act and very jealously guards them, has an air of creepiness about it.

It all comes down to motivation. Not talking about your Shadow because it's embarrassing is not creepy. Not talking about it because you know people will percieve you as a threat is creepy.
 
Sep 1, 2007
1,595
0
Venezuela
For crying out loud! READ it. It's not that long compared to a comic book or magazine article. But I guess it is long compared to a street sign or a quick tongue-n-cheek comment without any substance. Bunch of ADD rittled, over stimulated, trend desperate AGGHHHH... look see what you did, I can't even finish. My brain just exploded. If you don't want to read it, FINE... don't comment about it. GEEZ. It's too long? are you kidding me? If he wrote a book and put trendy B/W pictures in it, you would all be clamoring over it. Steerpike... heres your working title for the book "Dark vs. Punky Busters". My peeps from the 80's will get that reference.

###lazydog
I wrote it just to ask steerpike, to make a shorter version..
 
I see your point Steerpike at some degree bad trends with mis-lead thoughts can turn a mysterious character to seem creepy and un-interesting and make a entertainer less interesting. I say innovate rather than follow. Too many seem to find it easier to create a persona of someone else then turn around and claim it as their own which in that essence makes them the same as everyone else and to a point makes them creepy. Why not focus more on creating a character from what grows out of your performance. What I mean is if you feel dark is the focus of the character that portrays you then let that be told in the very story of your presentation rather than your trendy hot topic clothing and goth wear that does nothing but make you seem just like everyone else. You can wear a black suit and with the effectiveness of your presentation you can legitimately seem dark respectfully.

I have a fellow magician in my magic group she has been doing this for years and she pulls it off to a tee. Her types of magic include bulbs with blades on the string from mouth, cap gun roulette, electrocution, etc. But her delivery is flooring every time yet leaves her spectators with a filling of WOW she gets under my skin and shes amazing not creepy. That alone is awesome.

By the way not to get off topic but if the delivery of someones post isn't up to par for you just ignore it and move on as if they don't matter. If your intelligence is that much better just rise above it and continue the thread. Thats what I say.

Shane
 
Sep 1, 2007
3,786
15
I wrote it just to ask steerpike, to make a shorter version..

Which I won't. I'm not going to dumb down my work.

You can wear a black suit and with the effectiveness of your presentation you can legitimately seem dark respectfully.

While there is some truth in the old slogan that clothes make the man, you seem to understand the point better than most.

Creating beauty in darkness is not about where you shop, though appearances do help. As Andrew Mayne said, it's no coincidence that the most successful seance magicians have a certain look about them along with deep, resonant voices. In particular, look at Docc Hilford and Eugene Burger.

Interestingly, I've noticed that performers who have explored their Shadows and practice darker-themed art also tend to be very honest and easy-going people. There are plenty of exceptions to the rule (and if anyone says "exception that proves the rule" I'll chainsaw you in half), but in general I find them better company that people who pretend to be happy all the time. Being one emotion 24/7, in my eyes, is a sign of madness.
 
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