I'm new to magic, any advice?

Apr 12, 2016
13
17
I'm pretty new to magic and cardistry (about a month in). Now that I've got the basics (a clean double lift, a fast Sybil cut, a couple good forces and jumps) does anyone have any advice on how to move forward such as good tricks to learn or decks I need in my collection? Any tips would be great!
 
Nov 10, 2014
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Regarding decks, you don't *need* any. You can do magic with pretty much any deck and cardistry with pretty much any deck equal to or better than standard bikes. Also, what source are you using to learn these basics?
 
Apr 12, 2016
13
17
Regarding decks, you don't *need* any. You can do magic with pretty much any deck and cardistry with pretty much any deck equal to or better than standard bikes. Also, what source are you using to learn these basics?

Bike standards are all I've used this far. I've watched some YouTube videos as well as the ones posted here and on ellusionist.
 

DominusDolorum

Elite Member
Jul 15, 2013
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Typically a deck with an air cushion finish is better for magic, but you can do magic with any deck. It's actually more powerful if you're able to do a trick with a spectators borrowed deck. Since you are a beginner, get a copy of The Royal Road to Card Magic. You'll learn practical sleights not to mention tricks to go a long with them, and if you go through the book cover to cover you'll be a far better magician. A book I recently came across is Harry Lorayne's, The Magic Book, which teaches some of the card sleights in Royal Road, but you will also learn some excellent card tricks, coin magic, and magic with everyday items.

And please, don't mix cardistry and magic together.

"True art, we have been told, holds the mirror to nature. This is especially true of conjuring with cards. Complete naturalness of action, speech and manner is the essence of the art. There is a school of card conjuring in which the artist, by the mere rapidity of his actions, attempts to impress his audience with the great skill he possesses. We urge you to eschew this type of card work and instead strive at all times for a natural, relaxed, graceful handling of the cards."
- Hugard and Braue. Royal Road to Card Magic.

You want your audience to think you are doing real magic, not simply being clever with your hands. If you mix cardistry in the course of doing an effect then you run the risk of your spectators judging your quick actions as suspicious.

I'm not saying don't do cardistry, just keep it separate from your magic.

Welcome to Theory 11! And good luck with your magic, and your cardistry!
 
Apr 12, 2016
13
17
What type of magic strikes your fancy?
I am assuming card magic, but I just want to make sure.

As a preemptive recommendation, check out the Jason England video here in the 'Magic Tricks' section of the site on what to read

I've pretty much stuck to care magic so far, but I'm open to learning anything. Thanks for the recommendation.
 
Apr 12, 2016
13
17
Typically a deck with an air cushion finish is better for magic, but you can do magic with any deck. It's actually more powerful if you're able to do a trick with a spectators borrowed deck. Since you are a beginner, get a copy of The Royal Road to Card Magic. You'll learn practical sleights not to mention tricks to go a long with them, and if you go through the book cover to cover you'll be a far better magician. A book I recently came across is Harry Lorayne's, The Magic Book, which teaches some of the card sleights in Royal Road, but you will also learn some excellent card tricks, coin magic, and magic with everyday items.

And please, don't mix cardistry and magic together.

"True art, we have been told, holds the mirror to nature. This is especially true of conjuring with cards. Complete naturalness of action, speech and manner is the essence of the art. There is a school of card conjuring in which the artist, by the mere rapidity of his actions, attempts to impress his audience with the great skill he possesses. We urge you to eschew this type of card work and instead strive at all times for a natural, relaxed, graceful handling of the cards."
- Hugard and Braue. Royal Road to Card Magic.

You want your audience to think you are doing real magic, not simply being clever with your hands. If you mix cardistry in the course of doing an effect then you run the risk of your spectators judging your quick actions as suspicious.

I'm not saying don't do cardistry, just keep it separate from your magic.

Welcome to Theory 11! And good luck with your magic, and your cardistry!
Thanks so much, that book sounds really helpful, I'll look into getting a copy soon. Also, thanks for thenadvice about mixing magic and cardistry, I'll keep that in mind.
 

Gabriel Z.

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Apr 26, 2013
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I think everyone pretty much covered all the bases. One more piece of advice, practice your Up The Ladder Cuts consistently. If you pick up Expert Card Technique also by Hugard and Braue you will see they have the best method IMO. You can also download Jason Englands Push Through Shuffle tutorial he teaches it there. Record yourself performing sleights so you get an understanding of where you can improve. Here is the latest scoop on my Up The Ladder Cuts filmed about two weeks ago March 29th on my Birthday. I'm a sucker for false cuts. Hope this helps and welcome to Theory11. :)

 

DominusDolorum

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Jul 15, 2013
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I think everyone pretty much covered all the bases. One more piece of advice, practice your Up The Ladder Cuts consistently. If you pick up Expert Card Technique also by Hugard and Braue you will see they have the best method IMO. You can also download Jason Englands Push Through Shuffle tutorial he teaches it there. Record yourself performing sleights so you get an understanding of where you can improve. Here is the latest scoop on my Up The Ladder Cuts filmed about two weeks ago March 29th on my Birthday. I'm a sucker for false cuts. Hope this helps and welcome to Theory11. :)


Practising false shuffles and table cuts is an excellent way to gain finesse and skill with a packet of playing cards (as long as you are practising the move correctly). I do these for literally hours on end. It's become my therapy, practically. Expert Card Technique is definitely a must have book for card magicians.

This might benefit you, mattstephens12: http://dananddave.com/editorial/read-magic-book/
 
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Tower of Lunatic Meat

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That's one thing I meant to ask. Are you into basic card magic or more into gambling sleights?

Practising false shuffles and table cuts is an excellent way to gain finesse and skill with a packet of playing cards (as long as you are practising the move correctly). I do these for literally hours on end. It's become my therapy, practically. Expert Card Technique is definitely a must have book for card magicians.

This might benefit you, mattstephens12: http://dananddave.com/editorial/read-magic-book/

If you're into card magic. I'd recommend the above; practicing card sleights on end. I'm hooked on cardistry moves for the dexterity--even though it doesn't apply to virtually any card work I do, unfortunately.

But man, I know a few moves that definitely get attention and make for a good cold opener. And 'Backpack' makes a nice bar-bet.

But yeah, I should be practicing my card sleights more as well.
 
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Jun 6, 2015
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Charlotte NC
I can't recommend Roberto Giobbi's Card College series enough. In the five volume collection it takes you through all of moves, sleights, effects, and presentation aspects to really get you rolling in magic.

Just a general thought for beginners, try to stick with books for a while, you typically just get much more bang for your buck with books. I know it can be tempting when you see all of those epic trailers, but usually you'll only get one trick or a few sleights, with books you get dozens and dozens of sleights and effects. That being said, if you're looking for digital resources, try to get anthologies rather than single effects. This will help you get your foundations and fundamentals down much quicker.

I'd also subscribe to some YouTube channels, the ones I like are Jay Sankey, 52 Kards, and Disturb Reality (DR doesn't post much anymore, but you can work through some of his older videos).

Just a final thought, give yourself the time you need. Sleights like the pass, and false dealing take months, and even years to become proficient at. It can be pretty overwhelming when you're just starting out and see so much material packed in between the pages, but take your time. Make sure you can do all of your sleights very well before you start applying them to effects. It's much better to be able to do a few things very well, than a lot of things poorly.

Best of luck!
 

Gabriel Z.

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I can't recommend Roberto Giobbi's Card College series enough. In the five volume collection it takes you through all of moves, sleights, effects, and presentation aspects to really get you rolling in magic.

Just a general thought for beginners, try to stick with books for a while, you typically just get much more bang for your buck with books. I know it can be tempting when you see all of those epic trailers, but usually you'll only get one trick or a few sleights, with books you get dozens and dozens of sleights and effects. That being said, if you're looking for digital resources, try to get anthologies rather than single effects. This will help you get your foundations and fundamentals down much quicker.

I'd also subscribe to some YouTube channels, the ones I like are Jay Sankey, 52 Kards, and Disturb Reality (DR doesn't post much anymore, but you can work through some of his older videos).

Just a final thought, give yourself the time you need. Sleights like the pass, and false dealing take months, and even years to become proficient at. It can be pretty overwhelming when you're just starting out and see so much material packed in between the pages, but take your time. Make sure you can do all of your sleights very well before you start applying them to effects. It's much better to be able to do a few things very well, than a lot of things poorly.

Best of luck!

You forgot to mention Mismag822 I don't know if this was done on purpose or if you just forgot. From what I understand many people over at Area52 scoff at the use of youtube to learn card magic. I have read many posts over there claiming that the superior route is to use books and not DVDS. Hypocritically , about 3/4 of them have a youtube channel themselves. I personally don't see anything wrong with it(we are in the 21st century, but then again who am I? If you have the means to buy the resources go for it; Books, DVDs, Lecture Notes you name it. (Let all the light in). However, if you are limited to few resources then just buy the essentials(A deck of cards and maybe The Royal Road to Card Magic). Boom your set for the next 5 years . The Royal Road to Card Magic has about 70 some odd card tricks, enough to keep you busy for a while. I am the extravagant type I bought Roberto Giobbis Card College Vol 1-5 for $185 this is when I was receiving SSI for my condition. We all have a goal in mind weather it is to have a buttery smooth bottom deal , or the quickest pass the eye has never seen. What im trying to say is that I learned the hard way that if you put too much on your plate you are going to pay in the long run.
 

DominusDolorum

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Jul 15, 2013
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You forgot to mention Mismag822 I don't know if this was done on purpose or if you just forgot. From what I understand many people over at Area52 scoff at the use of youtube to learn card magic. I have read many posts over there claiming that the superior route is to use books and not DVDS. Hypocritically , about 3/4 of them have a youtube channel themselves. I personally don't see anything wrong with it(we are in the 21st century, but then again who am I? If you have the means to buy the resources go for it; Books, DVDs, Lecture Notes you name it. (Let all the light in). However, if you are limited to few resources then just buy the essentials(A deck of cards and maybe The Royal Road to Card Magic). Boom your set for the next 5 years . The Royal Road to Card Magic has about 70 some odd card tricks, enough to keep you busy for a while. I am the extravagant type I bought Roberto Giobbis Card College Vol 1-5 for $185 this is when I was receiving SSI for my condition. We all have a goal in mind weather it is to have a buttery smooth bottom deal , or the quickest pass the eye has never seen. What im trying to say is that I learned the hard way that if you put too much on your plate you are going to pay in the long run.

I imagine a lot of the people who scoff at the YouTube magicians only do so because they reveal marketed effects. Disturb Reality is probably the biggest one those revealers. But magicians who reveal their own effects is perfectly okay because it is is their own material (ex: Jay Sankey), not to mention they offer actual advice on how to perform it rather than just walking you through the method. Another thing about using Youtube is that its so accessible that you continuously move from trick to trick, instead of learning how to properly perform it.

It's like the age old story:
A new/young magician goes up to the older/experienced magician and says "I know over 1000 card tricks, sir. How many do you know?" The older magician thinks for a minute and replies "Oh. I would say about 8."
The moral being that the older magician focused on a small amount of tricks and perfected them. Whereas the younger magician is a "trickaholic" and jumps from one to the other. The later seems to apply to many of the young magicians who focus on getting their material from YouTube, which is not always properly taught.

All in all, focus on the basics, and really take your time. Learning magic involves patience, and it is something that will continuously be improved the more and more you practice. (again, directed towards mattstephens12, but also any other new magicians)
 

Tower of Lunatic Meat

Elite Member
Sep 27, 2014
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I never quite jumped into the Youtube wagon. Where I'm sitting, I don't have anything positive or anything negative to say about them; they just exist. But I wouldn't learn anything from them.

Honestly, invest into books. Preferably the paper kind (because paper books don't crash when you download Limewire onto your computer). There's more secrets in books than there are in tutorials and YouTube videos.
 

Dean Magic

Elite Member
Jun 13, 2013
452
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Florida
I generally agree with the idea of avoiding youtube for learning magic although 52Kards has put out some pretty good tutorials on some of the more more basic sleights. However, when it comes to cardistry I think youtube is a perfect source. If you don't have the money to buy cardistry DVD's and you want to see if it's something your even interested in then just go to youtube and search for some cardistry tutorials. You can learn a lot of the basics and then move onto DVDs if you want to keep working on it.

Also if you prefer learning magic in a video format then look into Dan Harlan's Tarbell series on penguinmagic. He works through the book in different sections (he's released 49 videos for Tarbell so far). That way you can also find sections that interest you like sleight of hand, coins, impromptu tricks etc. and only pay for those certain downloads. I'd recommend finding what interests you the most and then go from there. Magic is an investment so make sure your investing in things that you will really use and learn from. :D
 
I learn most of my card tricks/flourishes on YouTube, there are some great channels out there like 52Kards, Disturb Reality, Mismag822, they were already mentioned earlier. As for decks? If you're planning to do tricks that have something to do with destroying cards, I suggest sticking with the bikes. Other than that, any deck can be used for magic, just keep in mind your audience might damage the cards.
 

DominusDolorum

Elite Member
Jul 15, 2013
893
1,114
32
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I never quite jumped into the Youtube wagon. Where I'm sitting, I don't have anything positive or anything negative to say about them; they just exist. But I wouldn't learn anything from them.

Honestly, invest into books. Preferably the paper kind (because paper books don't crash when you download Limewire onto your computer). There's more secrets in books than there are in tutorials and YouTube videos.
The best way to keep a magic trick a secret is to put in writing after all xD So going into old books to find these hidden gems is a thrill (for me at least).
 
Nov 10, 2014
426
337
I never quite jumped into the Youtube wagon. Where I'm sitting, I don't have anything positive or anything negative to say about them; they just exist. But I wouldn't learn anything from them.

Honestly, invest into books. Preferably the paper kind (because paper books don't crash when you download Limewire onto your computer). There's more secrets in books than there are in tutorials and YouTube videos.
You keep mentioning Limeware specifically with this analogy, personal story? :p

I generally agree with the idea of avoiding youtube for learning magic although 52Kards has put out some pretty good tutorials on some of the more more basic sleights. However, when it comes to cardistry I think youtube is a perfect source. If you don't have the money to buy cardistry DVD's and you want to see if it's something your even interested in then just go to youtube and search for some cardistry tutorials. You can learn a lot of the basics and then move onto DVDs if you want to keep working on it.

Also if you prefer learning magic in a video format then look into Dan Harlan's Tarbell series on penguinmagic. He works through the book in different sections (he's released 49 videos for Tarbell so far). That way you can also find sections that interest you like sleight of hand, coins, impromptu tricks etc. and only pay for those certain downloads. I'd recommend finding what interests you the most and then go from there. Magic is an investment so make sure your investing in things that you will really use and learn from. :D

Personally I started with YT then a veered away from it more, though I did pick up some interesting things (though I am sure some people would blast me if they knew I learned it from an "illegitimate" source :p) On another note, some of the YT caridstry to is amazing. Chris Ramsay has some really good tutorials of original content.
 
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