No Stupid Questions

Ok, question round up! Only one question this time around.

Why is crediting important?


P.S.
I still forget to check The form responses so I apologize to who ever sent that because I have no idea how long its been there.
Well, credit is very important because you're appreciating someone for what they did. To be Magic Specific, if you're trying to perform a trick, and somebody asks you where you've learned it from, you wouldn't really want to tell them, or else the effect of showing the magic trick might not be that strong. You could at least say who made the trick, but no more. (Like don't say where you bought it, don't be that specific). So usually I get questions from people when they tell me how did you learn the trick, I wouldn't clearly say Theory11.com for example, I would say it from the Magician's name. Although if this is like a Youtube video, give the name of the magic trick or give the creator's name or even both. It would be a bad habit if you don't mention anything because you aren't appreciating the tricks. Tricks that you perform, that make you happy, you can't just say nothing about the creator.
 
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RealityOne

Moderator
Nov 1, 2009
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Well, credit is very important because you're appreciating someone for what they did. To be Magic Specific, if you're trying to perform a trick, and somebody asks you where you've learned it from, you wouldn't really want to tell them, or else the effect of showing the magic trick might not be that strong. You could at least say who made the trick, but no more. (Like don't say where you bought it, don't be that specific). So usually I get questions from people when they tell me how did you learn the trick, I wouldn't clearly say Theory11.com for example, I would say it from the Magician's name. Although if this is like a Youtube video, give the name of the magic trick or give the creator's name or even both. It would be a bad habit if you don't mention anything because you aren't appreciating the tricks. Tricks that you perform, that make you happy, you can't just say nothing about the creator.

I strongly disagree with crediting material you perform unless you are performing for other magicians who inquire as to the method. In a performance for non-magicians, any inference that there is a method distracts from the impossibility of an effect. An apparent impossibility is simply downgraded to a trick. Further, names like Annemann, Vernon, Marlo, Fulves, Tarbell and Slydini are probably meaningless. Heck, for most magicians names like Frank Garcia, Roy Benson, Alan Wakeling and Al Goshman may be unfamiliar.

When lay spectators ask about how I learned an effect, my answer is "I've spent years studying the work and writings of some famous and some not-so-famous magicians in search of impossibilities that can astonish and entertain. Hopefully, I've done one or the other or even both for you today." That answer adds to the magician's credibility (I've worked hard and studied and what I do is difficult) and provides an air of mystery by telling the truth. Saying, I've learned it from a guy called IExposeMagic on Youtube doesn't have the same ring. If they ask how they can learn magic, I'll steer them toward Mark Wilson book, "there was a famous magician in the 1980s who wrote an amazing book for beginners. Although the book seems to be just for beginners, it contains more real knowledge about magic than any other magic book I've read."

For magicians, the answer I give them depends on the effect / routine and how much I like them. If the routine is something I regularly perform, I typically won't provide sources because I don't want people copying what I've developed into a presentation piece -- unless of course if you are one of the less than a dozen magicians I trust to keep my secrets. If it is something I've learned for fun and I like the magician, I'll tell them the source. If I don't like them, I'll just say, "I think it was in the Jinx or the Sphinx or maybe Apocalypse or Trapdoor.":cool:
 
Nov 12, 2016
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Ok, so question round up. 3 new hot questions!

Are Henry Christ & Jesus Christ related?
Why do so called "professional magicians" expose effects on social media that belong to other magicians?
Why do some "magicians" choose to not teach verbally on the products they offer for sale?

Firstly IDK what the first is a reference to, and I even googled it. It didn't look malicious so I put it.
The third one has me real curious. You don't know how many times I had to rewatch the old Criss Angel DVDs as a kid, because HE REFUSED TO SAY ANYTHING. You were just supposed to understand through Vague Hand Motions and silent a walk though.
 
Jun 18, 2019
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West Bengal, India
Why do so called "professional magicians" expose effects on social media that belong to other magicians?
"Professional magicians" are just magicians who earn a living through magic.

As far as I'm aware, magic performances, writings or recordings can be protected by copyright, and a method must be new, have utility, be inventive and not have prior use to be patented (which very few methods truly are). So if somebody learnt an effect and exposed it publicly, as long as they didn't use the actual writings, recordings, etc., they are probably legally safe.

Exposing another magician's work becomes mostly an ethical issue at the end of the day. If a magician has horrible ethics, they will probably have pretty horrible word of mouth (though how much of that reaches non-magicians, I have no idea). If despite all that they can still manage to earn a living through magic, they'll still be a professional magician and be exposing methods. Those two things don't seem to be mutually exclusive.

That being said, your question has your answer. You mention they are ''so called'' professional magicians. Maybe they claim they are, but aren't. If they are, they might not have enough clout to attract negative press. If they are popular and still exposing effects that belong to other magicians, they might have personally acquired permission prior to revealing it, or the method is in public domain (for example, the Charlier Cut). Or they are deliberately attracting negative press, because apparently there's no such thing as bad publicity.

Why do some "magicians" choose to not teach verbally on the products they offer for sale?
I'm not really sure. It may be that they're not comfortable speaking to the camera? Or they think displaying the written instructions on the screen while executing the move is more efficient? Or it's a style choice? Maybe they forgot to export the audio?

I have come to not mind non-verbal tutorials however (a lot of cardistry tutorials are non-verbal). So if somebody's having a problem learning from a non-verbal instructional video, yet they have no alternative resource, I'd suggest slowing the speed to 0.25x, playing frame by frame and also trusting the intuition of your hands. There's only so many ways our fingers can move and sometimes, they instinctively know what to do, if you have spent enough time in sleight-of-hand magic.
 
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WitchDocIsIn

Elite Member
Sep 13, 2008
5,740
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Are Henry Christ & Jesus Christ related?

Henry Christ was a fairly prolific creator of card magic (https://www.conjuringarchive.com/list/person/141). His name was pronounced "kriss-t". The "Christ" of Jesus Christ is a title, not a name. So while I believe that question was not malicious, I'm guessing it wasn't entirely serious, either.

Why do so called "professional magicians" expose effects on social media that belong to other magicians?

Mohana touched on an important point above - "professional" just means you make the majority of your income through magic. A magician who runs a YouTube channel exposing other people's magic but makes enough money to live off of, for example, would be a professional magician.

While I believe jealousy and a lack of ethics frequently factors in, ultimately I believe it usually comes down to money and clout. Anyone in the performance field is looking to make money off performance, however they can. Many people have figured out they can use social media as a passive income source, and don't have the skill to create original content. So they expose and hope that will draw people's attention to click on the videos, and get their numbers high enough to make money.

Why do some "magicians" choose to not teach verbally on the products they offer for sale?

Couldn't say for sure but it's likely a combination of factors. Maybe the person doesn't speak the language they intend to sell to? Maybe they're just bad at explaining things? It's essentially, "Watch how I do this. Now you do it."

In person, this works just fine. It doesn't often translate very well into video, though. Which is why the vast majority of videos these days do include verbal instruction as well.
 
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Mar 9, 2021
39
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Question round up. 2 questions this time around:

why bother with magic books at all, when the most visual magic which online magic influencers use to get insane followings are the one-trick dvd's or online videos? I don't practice magic to just get followings but it's EXTREMELY frustrating after going through book after book and then being bested by people who don't put half that time into even thinking about their magic. Yes I am sour. But I still think the question is valid. Why bother with magic books? Why bother with Strong Magic and Maximum Entertainment and not just pitch in 10$ every month for the next awesome 'visual illusion'?

What does IT stand for?


When you're starting off Magic books are really important, because a lot of things you cannot find online. When your a working professional and need to touch back on something, or find a trick, magic books are much easier to manage than thousands of online videos
 
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