Getting started with coins and rings

Dec 4, 2016
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Hello community:

I am new learning magic. Have learning and practicing with cards, but to keep it fun and try different things I have been adviced to also learn some coins and rings magic.

The thing is I have no idea where to get started. I don't mean by some gimmicks but learn the basics.

Can you help me with that?
 
Oct 19, 2015
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This seems like a simple question, but I do not think the answer is easy! First, what do you plan on doing in magic? (e.g., Become a full time professional, become a part time professional, Just do it for fun, etc.) What will your audience look like? (e.g. kids only, young adults, Elderly only, completely random mix, etc.) Where do you want to perform? (e.g. streets magic and walk around magic, On stage, in homes for parties, etc. etc.) The point I am trying to make is that magic is an abstract performance art accordingly, there are so many different forms of magic.... illusionist, card tricks and cardistry, etc. etc.

I think to get started you have to have a vision of what you want to accomplish both short-term and long-term....that in turn allows you to develop a plan around what you want to do....I started a couple of years ago, my short-term plan was targeting my Grandkids and their parents (my kids). Then in time do free shows for kids in hospitals, YMCA Camps, Boys and Girls Clubs, etc.

Early on one of the professionals on this website suggested that I get Mark Wilsons, Complete Course in Magic (I found a used copy via Amazon.com for $9.00 it is a great starter book). It covers most forms of magic and most of the tricks you can learn and make from what is in this book, for very little money. I have focused on card tricks, rope tricks, large gimmick tricks that are very visual, and most recently sponge balls....it has been great fun and one step has led me to another.

Good Luck....I am sure other more experienced than I will add more.....
 
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For coin magic, my best recommendation is starting with Bobo's Modern Coin Magic by J.B. Bobo. It's essentially the coin magic bible and will get you started on everything you need to know and it's relatively inexpensive compared to other books. David Roth also has the Ultimate Coin Magic Collection which should also help you along your way.

You said you don't want gimmicks so I wouldn't recommend Odyssey by Calen Morelli until you want to use a gimmick since the whole effect relies on a gimmick. For non-gimmicked ring magic check out Divorce by Justin Miller (one of the moves on it actually is the same move as Reflex by Patrick Kun so it's like a two for one special). There is also Ring Thing by Garrett Thomas which I hear is pretty good. He also has Banded but it requires a gimmicked ring. So I would say your best bet right now is to pick up Divorce by Justin Miller and Ring Thing because they don't require any gimmicks.
 

RealityOne

Elite Member
Nov 1, 2009
3,744
4,076
New Jersey
I have been adviced to also learn some coins and rings magic.

Let me start by saying follow what interests you, not what other people think you should do. We learn best what we want to learn most. As @Timewise64 said, Mark Wilson's book is a great place to start with a little bit of everything, well except rings.

For coins, the inexpensive book is Bobo's Modern Coin Magic, the more expensive book is David Roth's Expert Coin Magic. A great DVD is Eric Jones's Metal, Volume 1. Get some silver 1967 Kennedy Half Dollars to work with. Alternatively, you can pick up some Walking Liberty halves which are more expensive.

I'm assuming you are talking about linking rings (not finger rings). Your best bet to learn with linking rings is here:
http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/S12017. If you are @Brett Hurley you would like these: http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/S14326. Another great option is Ellusionist's Messado Rings and DVD. The Messado rings are black and a higher quality set of rings than the Fantasmia Rings. You also can get larger diameter rings (5 inch, 8 inch, 10 inch and 12 inch) from Uday, Royal or DiFatta. For professional performance, you will want Proline, Porper or Owens rings.

There is an L&L world's Greatest Magic DVD for the Linking Rings which has six amazing routines. If you are really serious, Levant has his Ultimate Guide to the Linking Rings which is a 5 DVD set. Pete Biro has a great book The Real Secrets of the Linking Rings.

and most recently sponge balls....

Just don't point like Mark does in the book.
 
Dec 4, 2016
18
10
42
Mallorca
voylinux.com
Let me start by saying follow what interests you, not what other people think you should do. We learn best what we want to learn most. As @Timewise64 said, Mark Wilson's book is a great place to start with a little bit of everything, well except rings.

For coins, the inexpensive book is Bobo's Modern Coin Magic, the more expensive book is David Roth's Expert Coin Magic. A great DVD is Eric Jones's Metal, Volume 1. Get some silver 1967 Kennedy Half Dollars to work with. Alternatively, you can pick up some Walking Liberty halves which are more expensive.

I'm assuming you are talking about linking rings (not finger rings). Your best bet to learn with linking rings is here:
http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/S12017. If you are @Brett Hurley you would like these: http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/S14326. Another great option is Ellusionist's Messado Rings and DVD. The Messado rings are black and a higher quality set of rings than the Fantasmia Rings. You also can get larger diameter rings (5 inch, 8 inch, 10 inch and 12 inch) from Uday, Royal or DiFatta. For professional performance, you will want Proline, Porper or Owens rings.

There is an L&L world's Greatest Magic DVD for the Linking Rings which has six amazing routines. If you are really serious, Levant has his Ultimate Guide to the Linking Rings which is a 5 DVD set. Pete Biro has a great book The Real Secrets of the Linking Rings.



Just don't point like Mark does in the book.
Sorry if my English is not clear enough. I meant finger rings.
Thank you about the advices on coin magic.

I actually love close up magic. I want to learn those things because I like them.
Just wanted to explain I also revived the advice to learn it from the beginning and don't wait until you are good with cards.
 
Dec 4, 2016
18
10
42
Mallorca
voylinux.com
For coin magic, my best recommendation is starting with Bobo's Modern Coin Magic by J.B. Bobo. It's essentially the coin magic bible and will get you started on everything you need to know and it's relatively inexpensive compared to other books. David Roth also has the Ultimate Coin Magic Collection which should also help you along your way.

You said you don't want gimmicks so I wouldn't recommend Odyssey by Calen Morelli until you want to use a gimmick since the whole effect relies on a gimmick. For non-gimmicked ring magic check out Divorce by Justin Miller (one of the moves on it actually is the same move as Reflex by Patrick Kun so it's like a two for one special). There is also Ring Thing by Garrett Thomas which I hear is pretty good. He also has Banded but it requires a gimmicked ring. So I would say your best bet right now is to pick up Divorce by Justin Miller and Ring Thing because they don't require any gimmicks.

Thank you. Yes, the thing is not I don't like gimmicks. I just prefer not to use them until know the basics.
 
Dec 4, 2016
18
10
42
Mallorca
voylinux.com
This seems like a simple question, but I do not think the answer is easy! First, what do you plan on doing in magic? (e.g., Become a full time professional, become a part time professional, Just do it for fun, etc.) What will your audience look like? (e.g. kids only, young adults, Elderly only, completely random mix, etc.) Where do you want to perform? (e.g. streets magic and walk around magic, On stage, in homes for parties, etc. etc.) The point I am trying to make is that magic is an abstract performance art accordingly, there are so many different forms of magic.... illusionist, card tricks and cardistry, etc. etc.

I think to get started you have to have a vision of what you want to accomplish both short-term and long-term....that in turn allows you to develop a plan around what you want to do....I started a couple of years ago, my short-term plan was targeting my Grandkids and their parents (my kids). Then in time do free shows for kids in hospitals, YMCA Camps, Boys and Girls Clubs, etc.

Early on one of the professionals on this website suggested that I get Mark Wilsons, Complete Course in Magic (I found a used copy via Amazon.com for $9.00 it is a great starter book). It covers most forms of magic and most of the tricks you can learn and make from what is in this book, for very little money. I have focused on card tricks, rope tricks, large gimmick tricks that are very visual, and most recently sponge balls....it has been great fun and one step has led me to another.

Good Luck....I am sure other more experienced than I will add more.....
I don't know. By now I just want to learn, explore this passion and see where it takes me. :)
 
Jun 13, 2013
62
31
If English isn't your first language, I'd highly recommend getting DVDS/Video Downloads. Bobo's work will be very difficult to understand if you don't know the terminology. Bobo's book was made into a four volume DVD set (http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/1396), which may be far more worth your time and money.

Also, David Roth has some excellent DVDs. Though, if you're interested in his book, his book is not authored by him, it's by Richard Kaufman (I own it along with his DVDs. I highly recommend his works).

After you learn the basic moves and terminology, I'd highly recommend tracking down the 13 DVD volumes, "New York Coin Magic Seminar". Avoid wasting financial resources on one-trick videos. They're frequently a waste (emphasis on frequently as this doesn't always apply).

Anyways, some additional coin magicians that you may want to look up are:

Kainoa Harbottle
Homer Liwag
Dr. Sawa
Dan Watkins
Geoff Latta
Giacomo Bertini
Philippe Bougard & Clement Kerstenne
Dean Dill
Michael Rubinstein
David Stone
Johnny Wong
Michael Ammar

With regards to ring magic, the videos that I'm aware of are:

John Shryock "Ring in Walnut" (this is a video that is an exception to the rule that I stated above)
Worlds Greatest Magic "Finger Ring Magic"
Justin Miller "Ring Thru Finger"
De'Vo "De'ring"
David Jay "The Ring Master"
 
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Dec 4, 2016
18
10
42
Mallorca
voylinux.com
If English isn't your first language, I'd highly recommend getting DVDS/Video Downloads. Bobo's work will be very difficult to understand if you don't know the terminology. Bobo's book was made into a four volume DVD set (http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/1396), which may be far more worth your time and money.

Also, David Roth has some excellent DVDs. Though, if you're interested in his book, his book is not authored by him, it's by Richard Kaufman (I own it along with his DVDs. I highly recommend his works).

After you learn the basic moves and terminology, I'd highly recommend tracking down the 13 DVD volumes, "New York Coin Magic Seminar". Avoid wasting financial resources on one-trick videos. They're frequently a waste (emphasis on frequently as this doesn't always apply).

Anyways, some additional coin magicians that you may want to look up are:

Kainoa Harbottle
Homer Liwag
Dr. Sawa
Dan Watkins
Geoff Latta
Giacomo Bertini
Philippe Bougard & Clement Kerstenne
Dean Dill
Michael Rubinstein
David Stone
Johnny Wong
Michael Ammar

With regards to ring magic, the videos that I'm aware of are:

John Shryock "Ring in Walnut" (this is a video that is an exception to the rule that I stated above)
Worlds Greatest Magic "Finger Ring Magic"
Justin Miller "Ring Thru Finger"
De'Vo "De'ring"
David Jay "The Ring Master"
What a good explanation, thank you very much.
You made a good point because as you say, English is not my first language.

Many times, in magic, I feel like many people seams to be afraid on telling you to learn from videos. Books are great but it is true that in 2017 they may not always be the best option for everyone.

Really thank you for your advices.
 
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Tower of Lunatic Meat

Elite Member
Sep 27, 2014
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What a good explanation, thank you very much.
You made a good point because as you say, English is not my first language.

Many times, in magic, I feel like many people seams to be afraid on telling you to learn from videos. Books are great but it is true that in 2017 they may not always be the best option for everyone.

Really thank you for your advices.


The biggest gripe about DVDs is that you are only getting a fraction of material in comparison to what you'd get out of a book. And you'd be able to get books for cheaper (especially PDFs).

Plus, it's usually rare for someone to get a DVD and learn most, if not, all the tricks. I'm working on Ray Kosby's Impossible Card Magic and I honestly only see myself using 3 of the 12 tricks on the DVD (Initially, I only wanted it for 'Raise Rise', but I found a couple other gems). Which brings me to my next point.

DVDs can also fall into the same hole as singular tricks/gimmicks. You may find yourself outgrowing them and phasing them out of your repertoire.

Best advice I can give is that if a DVD or singular trick piques your interest, give it time to ruminate in your head. If it sounds like something you'll put the time into and utilize often, go for it.

Books will never go out of style.
 
Jun 13, 2013
62
31
The biggest gripe about DVDs is that you are only getting a fraction of material in comparison to what you'd get out of a book. And you'd be able to get books for cheaper (especially PDFs).

Plus, it's usually rare for someone to get a DVD and learn most, if not, all the tricks. I'm working on Ray Kosby's Impossible Card Magic and I honestly only see myself using 3 of the 12 tricks on the DVD (Initially, I only wanted it for 'Raise Rise', but I found a couple other gems). Which brings me to my next point.

DVDs can also fall into the same hole as singular tricks/gimmicks. You may find yourself outgrowing them and phasing them out of your repertoire.

Best advice I can give is that if a DVD or singular trick piques your interest, give it time to ruminate in your head. If it sounds like something you'll put the time into and utilize often, go for it.

Books will never go out of style.

I actually agree with you 100%. I've been burnt by video purchases (and gimmicks) far more often than I have books. Videos these days are the proverbial dime-a-dozen. I own a lot of magic videos primarily due to the reason that I don't have the room at the moment for more books (this doesn't stop me from buying them, I'm just really picky at the moment). My personal non-fiction library is around 10,000 books by estimate. No, they're not all magic. Name a topic, and I've probably got something on it. So, right now, I have more room on my hard drive than I do in my library.

With that said, I also speak Spanish, and when I lived in South America, it was much easier for me to have a visual to go with what was being said. Hence, I recommend DVDs/Videos for the ESL learner.
 

RealityOne

Elite Member
Nov 1, 2009
3,744
4,076
New Jersey
Heck, I've never met another magic enthusiast outside of a magic shop. Attached below is a picture of my study and my chair (which desperately needs replaced with a Queen Ann wingback)

Ok, one more picture. I tend to geek out over people's libraries and studies, so maybe you'll appreciate this. This is my desk in my study. Yeah, my study is pretty eclectic.

Awesome. Just Awesome. I love the bookshelves in front of the bookshelves. So how many of those books are magic related?

We should start a thread showing magic collections / magic rooms. It would be interesting to see other people's stashes. Mine isn't nearly as eclectic or interesting since it is contained in two closets and all the props are stored in plastic tubs.
 
Jun 13, 2013
62
31
Awesome. Just Awesome. I love the bookshelves in front of the bookshelves. So how many of those books are magic related?

We should start a thread showing magic collections / magic rooms. It would be interesting to see other people's stashes. Mine isn't nearly as eclectic or interesting since it is contained in two closets and all the props are stored in plastic tubs.

So, all of my magic books that I own in hardback are on my desk, which is about 20 books. In digital format, I have 1,000+. Ironically though, I am not a fan whatsoever of "digital texts". When I moved to South America (over a decade ago already), I sold all of my magic stuff (except for my old copy of Bobo). Since I've been back in the states, I've been buying up books left and right. However, I'm VERY selective when it comes to buying books brand new. When it comes to most magic texts, I want to get them new (or at least in exceptional condition)... but man, that gets spendy. And since I own a majority of the standard texts in digital format, I find myself justifying buying any other book on some Sociology, Media Ecology, Soci0-Psychology, or Philosophy topic.
 

CMT

Jan 12, 2017
7
2
35
Snohomish, WA
I personally had a goal of being able to entertain with anything in my pockets. Something non gimmicked and would be reasonable for me to carry with me. I love card magic because its such a wide array of different ways to perform. Coin magic I would say pick up second. It relies so heavily on the performance itself and you cant hide behind color changes or reveals. But ultimately start with what you want. I would check out youtube. Easy to learn from and you can get a better handle on the basics but of course the real good stuff you want to buy.

Good luck buddy!
 
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