Hugo

Sep 2, 2007
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Houston, TX
Last night I watched a new movie called Hugo. It's based off of the book The Invention of Hugo Cabret. The book was a great book so I knew I'd like to see the movie. The movie is based a lot on magic, which is cool. They mention a few magicians, one being Robert Houdin and the other..well I thought the other was quite funny.

FYI, this is, in no way, a spoiler - in the movie, Hugo and the girl (can't remember her name) walk into a library. The girl turns a book into the librarian and says "Thank you, I think I'm half way in love with David Copperfield!" Obviously, this infered that the book she read was about Copperfield.

I thought this was funny, considering David Copperfield was born in 1956 - this movie (and book) was set around 1931, thus making her statement kindof absurd considering he hadn't even been born yet!

Anyway, thought I'd share! It's a great movie, though, I'd suggest checking it out!
 
Aug 17, 2010
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The speaker (or writer) implies, the listener (or reader) infers.

The Dickens novel David Copperfield was first published in 1850.
 
Jan 20, 2009
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California
The speaker (or writer) implies, the listener (or reader) infers.

The Dickens novel David Copperfield was first published in 1850.

I just finished reading that book last week, its a great book.
 
Sep 26, 2007
592
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Tokyo, Japan
The girl turns a book into the librarian and says "Thank you, I think I'm half way in love with David Copperfield!" Obviously, this infered that the book she read was about Copperfield.

I thought this was funny, considering David Copperfield was born in 1956 - this movie (and book) was set around 1931, thus making her statement kindof absurd considering he hadn't even been born yet!

Teehee. And folks, this is why we should stay in school.


Just teasing. The novel, David Copperfield is quite famous, thus I am surprised you did not know they were referring to the novel, and not the magician.
 
Jan 20, 2009
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California
Teehee. And folks, this is why we should stay in school.


Just teasing. The novel, David Copperfield is quite famous, thus I am surprised you did not know they were referring to the novel, and not the magician.
I am so surprised how many people are not familiar with Charles Dickens
 
Nov 8, 2007
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Please look up the word "infer" and the novel "David Copperfield" written by Charles Dickens.

Thinking back now to all those posts where young magicians are saying all they do in class is screw around with cardistry... I feel a little sick.
 
Dec 18, 2007
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Northampton, MA - USA
Please look up the word "infer" and the novel "David Copperfield" written by Charles Dickens.

Thinking back now to all those posts where young magicians are saying all they do in class is screw around with cardistry... I feel a little sick.

Yea, but this is the U.S.A. where EVERYTHING is disposable. . . even one's mind or sense of purpose.

Our education system SUCKS for so many reasons, the biggest of which is the downfall of discipline (both, at home as well as the schools) followed closely by teachers that are only allowed to work as a robot, feeding kids material in ways that don't spark their imagination and thus, don't inspire them. For the Magic Wannabe types, the fact that their biggest secret weapon as a performer IS THEIR MIND seems to elude them, let alone skills associated with self-discipline and not making excuses to slack off.

It's amazing just how far you can go when you've taken the time to simply read and experience Dickens, Poe, Orwell, and the many others out there; we're talking about the keys that not just open your mind but unlock the imagination so as to take you on wondrous adventures. Books of all sort, empower us to be creative, resourceful and in understanding life itself. Some of you may chuckle when I say it, but I think everyone needs to read the Bible, the Koran and the Bahgva Gita at least once in their life, preferably when young (between 13 and 25) just so they can honestly understand what the common ground is each of them share as well as the nuances that separate them. Most importantly, such an exercise allows us to digest things better and not just buy into this or that rhetoric as it pertains to the issue of religion and religious choice. When you live in a particular society it is ASSUMED you will simple tow the national policy/family tradition; how is this a choice? There can't be a "Freedom of Religion" when you're not allowed to weigh the options, now can there? Reading allows us to understand such "traps" and more importantly, gives us our birth right to choose based on personal conviction vs. peer pressure and mass media.

HUGO has many pertinent lessons in it; read it again and this time take notes. ;-)
 
Nov 27, 2009
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Yea, but this is the U.S.A. where EVERYTHING is disposable. . . even one's mind or sense of purpose.

I laughed at this. The saying, "it's funny because it's true" applies here, even though the implications of this aren't funny at all. Hopefully I'm not falling into the same pattern as the rest of American culture.
 
Aug 28, 2010
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calm down guys...

While it seemed a bit obvious that the girl in the movie was not talking about David Copperfield the magician, I dont think its so outlandish that a young magician think of the MODERN DAY entertainer before he thought of a novel written in 1850!! I'll type that again...1850!!!! It IS possible that he is not familiar with the work, yet still has an IQ above the level displayed by Forest Gump. I'm pretty sure ridiculing him isn't helping to educate the masses. Let's lift eachother up, not put eachother down. He missed a novel written over 160 years ago. He's now been informed of its existance. Let's leave it at that. Please don't stoop to the level of insulting our fellow forum members over such a trivial mistake.
 
Aug 17, 2010
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It's amazing just how far you can go when you've taken the time to simply read and experience Dickens, Poe, Orwell, and the many others out there; we're talking about the keys that not just open your mind but unlock the imagination so as to take you on wondrous adventures.

These are the things that define our culture, our shared heritage. These are the stories that have reverberated for generations - so much so that they have become part of us whether we realize it or not. How many times has the Telltale Heart been essentially retold in different settings by differing authors? The terms Big Brother, thoughtcrime and 1984 are written all over our collective subconscious to the point where we simply intuit what these mean without having read the novel.
 
Sep 2, 2007
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Houston, TX
You learn something new every day! Although, it'd be nice to be told this without being ridiculed. I'm an optician, not a writer. I dont read literature from the 1850s and considering the movie had a lot to do with magic, I thought maybe there was a mistake.
 
Sep 26, 2007
592
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Tokyo, Japan
You learn something new every day! Although, it'd be nice to be told this without being ridiculed. I'm an optician, not a writer. I dont read literature from the 1850s and considering the movie had a lot to do with magic, I thought maybe there was a mistake.

Part of the ridicule came from you mentioning in an earlier post that you don't believe school is for you. However, it is because of things like your original post in this thread that lead us to believe you are just lazy, and do not want to put the focus into school, because you see magic as an easier out.

There are those around the world that would give anything for the chance at an education you have access to. There are those with genuine learning disabilities that put all they have into making sure they keep up with school standards.

You gave facts and figure about David Copperfield's birthday, and dates and facts on which the movie/ books were about, portraying yourself as an educated man who has "found a flaw" in the movie story line, yet in other posts, claim education is not for you. You contradict yourself.

Put the cards down, study more, get a degree, experience the world, and then make claims like "education wasn't for me," and we will take you more seriously, without the ridicule. Please don't waste your chance at getting a higher education, because I would rather you drop out now, work at McDonalds, and give someone who actually wants the chance, your good fortune.
 
Sep 2, 2007
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Houston, TX
Steve Jobs dropped out of school.

A higher education is not necessary. Just because someone doesn't receive a higher education doesn't mean they will be working at McDonald's all their life. I've chosen that it's not for me and nobody can change my mind.
 
Steve Jobs dropped out of school.

A higher education is not necessary. Just because someone doesn't receive a higher education doesn't mean they will be working at McDonald's all their life. I've chosen that it's not for me and nobody can change my mind.

Agreed, and disagreed.

My dad had a highschool education and went quite far like that -- at the same time -- he's very much against me not going to university; people who drop out of highschool/don't go to post-sec usually do it because of money issues or are on the verge of making a huge breakthrough of some sort.
 
Jan 20, 2009
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California
Agreed, and disagreed.

My dad had a highschool education and went quite far like that -- at the same time -- he's very much against me not going to university; people who drop out of highschool/don't go to post-sec usually do it because of money issues or are on the verge of making a huge breakthrough of some sort.

Years ago you could go far on just a high school diploma and now the only thing that diploma is good
for is hanging on the wall.
 
His diploma didn't have anything to do with the job he does now... And I disagree with a highschool diploma being nothing -- he's hired people who do just have a highschool diploma/something very simple post-sec wise
 
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