rizer review

Sep 1, 2007
231
1
36
Cleveland, Ohio
I received the rizer DVD in the mail today, have had time to play around with it, so here's my review.

I'll start off by saying that, in the right hands, this is one killer effect. The effect is beautiful, and the method is damned clever. But there's a few issues I have with the product so let me get those out of the way first.

I was quite disappointed with the quality of production of the video. Not that is has anything to do with the effect but nowadays it's something you come to expect from a company like Ellusionist and this time they let me down. It was shot in what appeared to be their (messy) warehouse. The lighting was off, the camera and microphone kept getting bumped and the whole deal just felt really amateur which surprised me considering Ellusionist pioneered the modern magic video format we've all become familiar with. Also this was my first experience with Robert Smith and Eric Ross and as nice as they seem, the teaching felt painfully unrehearsed. Now don't get me wrong, they teach it thoroughly, but they just seemed to stumble over each others words and it just felt rushed. Some parts of the video we're obviously filmed with different cameras and added as if an after thought. The best part of the production was the music which i was quite fond of. Also I think the advertising is a bit misleading as it does not come with the gimmick you need. Now many of us already have what you need and if you don't its nothing a trip to the store and $2 won't solve. It does come with something but not exactly what you need for the effect.

Now, on to the good stuff.

You've seen the demo clip, this effect is beautiful. On top of that, it's SIMPLE. I had an idea how it was accomplished, I was right. It uses an old principle in a way that blows the doors open as far as what can be achieved with it. Two thumbs up to these guys for being clever enough to think this up. This one is certainly not going to see the dusty old never-used magic drawer, this is a real worker. You have no angles to worry about here because there's nothing to hide, ditch, steal or even cover. It's quite practical considering the nature of things, not much to carry around if anything at all (at most a small vile that they send you which can go right on your keychain). It's completely examinable a moment after the effect is done and it can reset in a matter of a few seconds if you're keeping the same card or a few minutes if you want to change the rising card. For walk around I would suggest just using the same card if you can just to save some time resetting, but if you decide that's not appropriate it only takes another minute to change the rising card and prepare for another performance.
Its also worth mentioning that this will take a bit of playing around with to get just right. Nothing out of the ordinary but don't expect this to perform itself, you ll have to get the fine details of preparation down.




People like ratings so I'll give a try at rating this.

Ease of use: 8/10

Practicality: 8/10

Versatility: 8/10

Teaching: 7/10

Video Production: 4/10

I'd be glad to answer any questions or if I've left something out let me know.

Happy magic.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Nov 8, 2007
1,248
3
I don't feel like I learned anything at all about the effect from reading your review. You wrote nothing about any of the key points for anyone considering the effect: Angles? Practicality? Pocket management? Reset? Examinability (I just made that word up)? How easy is it to repeat the effect with a different card each time for a walk-around gig? Is it a messy effect to perform?

Forget the number ratings and production value--tell us about the actual effect. That's what's being sold here.
 
Sep 1, 2007
231
1
36
Cleveland, Ohio
Sorry, I left those things out because they are described in the ad for the effect. They are exactly as described on the ad site. Sorry I'll edit the review to reflect my feelings on that. Thanks.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Nov 8, 2007
1,248
3
Sorry, I left those things out because they are described in the ad for the effect.

Magic dealers write the ad to sell the effect though--and collectively they have a bad reputation for how misleading they are with those ads.

Look forward to hearing more of your thoughts on the effect.
 
i feel like though a neat idea. why would i go into a situation and draw with sharpie on my arm? maybe good for "Street" magic, but i have seen versions of this using cards and notebook paper that work just as well, and wont get ink all over my arm.
i could never see me doing this for a gig.
 
Sep 1, 2007
733
2
as far as this being a "real worker" I guess that's open for discussion, because I'm with Chris on this, I wouldn't ever do this at a paid gig. My attire far too formal to risk getting sharpie on. But again, up for discussion.

I would however say that this effect isn't commercial at all.
 
Sep 1, 2007
231
1
36
Cleveland, Ohio
as far as this being a "real worker" I guess that's open for discussion, because I'm with Chris on this, I wouldn't ever do this at a paid gig. My attire far too formal to risk getting sharpie on. But again, up for discussion.

I would however say that this effect isn't commercial at all.

Sure, I wouldn't do this for a formal event either. And if I did it would be an after show, relaxed type of situation. I think were all smart enough to decide what kind of effects are and aren't appropriate for different situations. Theres plenty of great magic that doesn't fit into every situation you may find yourself in, and that's fine.
As far as it not being commercial, what exactly do you mean by that?
 
Sep 20, 2009
446
83
It's Rubbish that things cost as bloody much as they do.

it's nothing 'new' and 'groundbreaking' just an idea based off old principles

far too much to pay
 
Sep 2, 2007
1,182
118
28
Houston, TX
First off, I don't own this trick, and I won't. Just not my style. I think it is sweet, but just isn't me.

For my thoughts - I think there is a lot to be said for openly drawing the picture on your arm in front of the audience. My question is this: Once you do the trick, do you have to scrub that sharpie off your arm before you can do it again? Does it come off or by the end of the day will you have a pack of cards drawn somewhere for each time you performed the trick? I could see it problematic if you perform it for a friend, and then 5 minutes later they see your arm totally clean with nothing on it even though you drew it with "Permanent" marker.
 
Dec 13, 2007
807
0
North Hollywood
you can do the trick with the pack of cards already drawn, sort of in a prediction kind of way. or you can use dry erase marker instead of sharpie if you want it to come off easier. any other questions on rizer. fire away!
 

Luis Vega

Elite Member
Mar 19, 2008
1,798
197
35
Leon, Guanajuato Mexico
luisvega.com.mx
First off, I don't own this trick, and I won't. Just not my style. I think it is sweet, but just isn't me.

For my thoughts - I think there is a lot to be said for openly drawing the picture on your arm in front of the audience. My question is this: Once you do the trick, do you have to scrub that sharpie off your arm before you can do it again? Does it come off or by the end of the day will you have a pack of cards drawn somewhere for each time you performed the trick? I could see it problematic if you perform it for a friend, and then 5 minutes later they see your arm totally clean with nothing on it even though you drew it with "Permanent" marker.

I think you have a very good point..I don´t want to have a drawing in my arm all day...especially when I am at the architecture firm...
 
Sep 1, 2007
231
1
36
Cleveland, Ohio
First off, I don't own this trick, and I won't. Just not my style. I think it is sweet, but just isn't me.

For my thoughts - I think there is a lot to be said for openly drawing the picture on your arm in front of the audience. My question is this: Once you do the trick, do you have to scrub that sharpie off your arm before you can do it again? Does it come off or by the end of the day will you have a pack of cards drawn somewhere for each time you performed the trick? I could see it problematic if you perform it for a friend, and then 5 minutes later they see your arm totally clean with nothing on it even though you drew it with "Permanent" marker.

I don't want marker on my arm for days either, so I don't use permanent marker. Problem solved.
But really it's up to you, if you want it to stay there then you don't wash it off. But either way I don't see any issue with that specifically.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Sep 1, 2007
231
1
36
Cleveland, Ohio
It's Rubbish that things cost as bloody much as they do.

it's nothing 'new' and 'groundbreaking' just an idea based off old principles

far too much to pay

JUST an idea based off an old principle? That's no small feat sir, not as far as I can tell. Is an effect that uses a double lift in a new and interesting way JUST an idea based on an old principle?

If you think it's too expensive then don't buy it, that's a whole different issue.
 
Sep 20, 2009
446
83
Indeed, it is only an idea based off older ideas if you know the method to this effect then you might understand. it's nothing new or groundbreaking like i already said so the point to charge that much for this is what's bollocks... greed overtakes everything.. it's quite sad
 
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