Who should we emulate, exactly?

Dec 5, 2007
379
0
ah man someone please tell me what routines i do that are out dated, i've been living a lie all this time...please cirtique my show and tell me what i'm doing wrong that is not advancing our art in any way shape or form i need to know this so i can listen to what other magicians think rather than my paying audience...

in all honestly though please do tell me what is dated in my show i'm very curious as to what others may think is dated and holding back the artform - this intrigues me since i don't have fans blowing my hair and open shirts and peter gabriel music...i'm all ears and i will take this seriously

From reading throgh the thread i dont think anyone said that all magicians are dated.

I dont know i would use the word dated, instead i would say that magic has become very unexciting.
 
Dec 14, 2007
823
2
From reading throgh the thread i dont think anyone said that all magicians are dated.

I dont know i would use the word dated, instead i would say that magic has become very unexciting.

Whydo you think that is? Do you think it is true for laymen as well? What would you find exciting? What magic have you seen that you did find truly exciting? And do you think laypeople would find these same things equally exciting?

Steer, as I have written repeatedly, it is a fallacy to move from the specific to the general. We are talking about society's perception of magic - their values and attitudes. When I speak in the plural, I am talking about this overall perspective. My personal perspective may be unique, as may be yours. And then again, it may be inline with the masses.

This is a discussion of society's perception of magic - not yours or mine except when they may be representative.

I have no intention of speaking for you.
 
Nov 20, 2007
4,434
6
Sydney, Australia
A quick side note: I suspect that British people would be predispositioned to make fun of Americans more readily than they would, say, Derren. On this subject, it is interesting to note as well that Japan is a far more communal based country.

As far as differences go though, the interesting question is indeed why Blaine and Angel get laughed at in America, but Derren doesn't in the UK (or, indeed, why I referred to Blaine and Angel by their last names, but Derren by his first).

I think part of the answer lies in their material, once again, as well as their personal styles. The last thing I watched of Derren's was where he helped a man develop confidence in himself. The thing before that, it was debunking psychics. Now don't get me wrong, I'm skeptical about magic shows in general on TV. But I can't but respect the sort of thing that Derren presents. And I can't help but think that I would be happy with my life if I could help one person get over their fear like that.

By contrast, when I watch Angel and Blaine, which I haven't done for a while admittedly, what do I see? I see Blaine doing some endurance stunt with all the expressiveness of Rupert Grint. I see Angel getting someone to go down a slide - and instantly turn into a child - and I just laughed at the absurdity of the thing.

These things are (mostly) impressive - but I know who I respect more, and who I find more interesting. I can't speak on Cyril, not having really watched him perform apart from a trick or two. Angel and Blaine appear different. Intriguing, but different. Derren's performances are different, but he himself appears humble, and real. The former is of course easier to make fun of.
 
Sep 1, 2007
3,818
15
Likewise, blaine went to england and was laughed out of the country. So, why did the english people as a whole embrave derren but torment and ridicular blaine?

Why are you asking me when you answered the question yourself several days ago?

Steer, as I have written repeatedly, it is a fallacy to move from the specific to the general.

Why are you addressing me when quoting somebody else?
 

Luis Vega

Elite Member
Mar 19, 2008
1,800
200
35
Leon, Guanajuato Mexico
luisvega.com.mx
A quick side note: I suspect that British people would be predispositioned to make fun of Americans more readily than they would, say, Derren. On this subject, it is interesting to note as well that Japan is a far more communal based country.

As far as differences go though, the interesting question is indeed why Blaine and Angel get laughed at in America, but Derren doesn't in the UK (or, indeed, why I referred to Blaine and Angel by their last names, but Derren by his first).

I think part of the answer lies in their material, once again, as well as their personal styles. The last thing I watched of Derren's was where he helped a man develop confidence in himself. The thing before that, it was debunking psychics. Now don't get me wrong, I'm skeptical about magic shows in general on TV. But I can't but respect the sort of thing that Derren presents. And I can't help but think that I would be happy with my life if I could help one person get over their fear like that.

By contrast, when I watch Angel and Blaine, which I haven't done for a while admittedly, what do I see? I see Blaine doing some endurance stunt with all the expressiveness of Rupert Grint. I see Angel getting someone to go down a slide - and instantly turn into a child - and I just laughed at the absurdity of the thing.

These things are (mostly) impressive - but I know who I respect more, and who I find more interesting. I can't speak on Cyril, not having really watched him perform apart from a trick or two. Angel and Blaine appear different. Intriguing, but different. Derren's performances are different, but he himself appears humble, and real. The former is of course easier to make fun of.


I agree with you...unfortunately here is different...I don´t understand why all magicians I met follow a specific stereotype...all dress the same, all talk the same, and have the same tricks...

I have been looking somebody to look up to here...unfortunately I haven´t find nobody...so I am eager to change that soon...

sometimes I think people look at other magicians from others countries because of that sole reason..so hard to find somebody to feel identified in your own...
 
Dec 14, 2007
823
2
Steer,

Because your post focused the issue on you and your choices, and what we are dealing with is an overall public position.

But I haven't answered the question, I don't think.

I think I know part of the issue, but am not sure that is everything. Not willing to accept the first simple answer that appears to address a complex issue.

I think praev (forgive shortening, on bberry and cannot see other posts) has a great point. There is a normalcy about derren. And the type of material he is presenting appeals to intelligent minds that might wish to contemplate the skills at play as well as having social implications. It's hardly as contrived as tearing something up only to want to put it back together.

Sadly, I do not understand japanese so cannot comment on cyril"s performances, but it seems from conversations I have had the good fortune to listen to that he really approaches his work with an aesthetic sense.
 
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